Month: September 2018

Pay in the legal sector
Articles

Pay in the legal sector: men vs women

April 2018 was the deadline by which large UK firms (those with more than 250 people in their employ) had to publish their pay data. The government deadline was set in order to explore whether the gender pay gap was still a prevailing issue, and if it was, how badly skewed the pay rates were between men and women.
Law firms were among the first to respond, according to The Law Society Gazette. To investigate the data further, we’re joined by accident at work solicitor firm, True Solicitor:

The April deadline

The British government requested pay data to be published by 4th April 2018. The results can be accessed here. Though it came as no surprise that the pay gap was still prevalent, the sheer scale of difference between men and women’s pay across businesses was quite alarming. The Independent reported on Ryanair’s revelation that women are paid 67% less in their company for example.

Law firm pay

Comparatively, law firms didn’t reflect too badly in their pay data, but there is indeed still a gap. A law firm in South Yorkshire reported that the women in their workplace earned a 15.9% less median hourly rate compared to their male counterparts. However, a London-based law firm saw their women’s median hourly rate at 37.4% lower than men’s.

2018 saw the largest international survey of women in law, with The Law Society receiving responses from 7,781 people. The study found that while 60% were aware of a pay gap problem in their workplace, only 16% reported seeing anything being actively done about it. 74% of men said there was progress regarding the difference in pay between the genders, but only 48% of women agreed with that statement.

Why is there a gap in gender pay?

What factor, or factors, are contributing to the gender pay gap? Is it a difference in bonuses, or are higher job positions less readily available for women?

Women received a median bonus pay that was 20% lower than their male co-workers, according to data published by the previously referenced South Yorkshire law firm. The London-based firm noted a 40% lower median bonus pay for women compared to men. It clear that bonuses are also suffering from the same gender discrimination as standard wages. Furthermore, in terms of job roles, The Law Society’s survey showed 49% of law workers believe that an unacceptable work/life balance is needed to reach senior roles and is to blame for the gender pay gap, so it is feasible that starting a family is deemed a disadvantage for women.

There’s a difference in view between men and women starting a family, says The Balance Careers, with men being regarded favourably when starting a family. But for a woman, having children brings an unfair stigma of unreliability, that they may put their family first. This can cause discrimination when aiming for higher roles within the firm, such as partner positions.

Women in higher roles

Sadly, for women who attain the status of partner in a law firm, the pay gap remains. In fact, according to The Financial Times, female partners in London-based law firms earn on average 24% less compensation than men. 34% of women earn less than £250,000, where 15% of men earn less than £250,000.

Dealing with the pay gap

The BBC published many ideas for how to resolve the gender pay gap. These suggestions include:

• Better, balanced paternity leave — allowing fathers to take paternity leave, or having a shared parental leave, would allow mothers to return to work earlier.
• Childcare support — childcare is expensive! Support for childcare expenses would help both men and women in the workplace.
• Allowing parents to work from home — the ability to work from home while raising a family would open up additional opportunities for women to balance both a career and a family.
• A pay raise for female workers — a simple solution, but a pay raise for women can quickly equalise the pay rate between men and women.

Issues

Issue 9 2018

Click the image to read this issue

Welcome to the ninth issue of Wealth & Finance International Magazine, which is dedicated to providing fund managers, institutional and private investors with the very latest industry news in the traditional and alternative investment landscapes.

Disruption and innovation define the modern investment landscape, as firms look to step away from the tried and tested waters of the traditional and onto new lands. Global institutions are adopting the latest technological advancements to give them an edge over their peers and competitors or adapting strategies to thrive despite market volatility. The Tycuda Group, one of Canada’s leading investment establishments, very much fits this mould, believing that unpredictable market conditions can be overcome with flexibility and experience. We spoke with the firm’s Portfolio Manager, Miles Clyne, to find out more.

As part of the cover story for this month’s issue, we spoke to CEO Mahmoud ElSaeed. His company, The YBN Group, are the pioneers behind the world’s first “Virtual Global Citizenship”, which aims to reimagine and reinvigorate investment advisory services to allow his clients to attain true financial freedom. We interviewed the man behind the business to find out how his leadership style helps drive the company’s lofty goals.

Finally, Wealth & Finance International was offered the opportunity to experience one of Stratajet’s flights first-hand as we interviewed the firm’s CEO, Jonny Nicol. Stratajet is the world’s first real-time online private jet booking platform, helping to revive an industry that has traditionally struggled to attract new audiences. Nicol offers a remarkable insight into how he challenges the conventions of this exclusive market.

At Wealth & Finance Magazine, we sincerely hope that you enjoy reading this month’s issue and look forward to hearing from you.

Laura Brookes | Editor

Inheritance Tax
Family OfficesIndirect TaxInheritance TaxReal Estate

Number Of Retail Investors Seeking IHT Advice Set To Rise

Advisers highlight expected increased use of flexible IHT solutions for clients

More than three out of four (78%) financial advisers expect the number of retail investors seeking help for IHT planning to increase over the next three years, according to new research from TIME Investments, which specialises in tax efficient investment solutions.  The findings come as IHT receipts hit a record £5.2 billion in 2017-18 despite the introduction of an additional nil-rate band.

Six out of ten (63%) advisers also predict an increase in the number of IHT products and investment solutions to be launched in the UK.  However, whilst this will offer more choice to investors, it also comes with a health warning – 88% of advisers questioned are concerned that new products will be launched by firms that don’t have the appropriate track record and/or expertise.

Two thirds of advisers predict an increase in the use of Business Relief (formerly known as Business Property Relief) over the next three years to help people reduce their IHT liabilities.  To encourage investors to support UK businesses, the Government allows shares held in qualifying companies that are not listed on any stock exchange and some of those listed on AIM to qualify for Business Relief. This means that once owned for two years, the shares no longer count towards the taxable part of an inheritable estate and are free from inheritance tax at point of death.

The accessibility of Business Relief investments and the range of investment opportunities available help to provide flexibility in IHT planning.  Three quarters of advisers felt that the increasing use of Power of Attorney due to rising dementia rates would contribute to the growth in the use of these flexible IHT solutions.

Henny Dovland, TIME Investments’ IHT expert comments: “The number of families in the UK being caught in the IHT net is increasing.  This represents a significant opportunity for advisers specialising in IHT and intergenerational planning and is reflected in our findings that reveal more specialist products are set to be launched in this market. However, care needs to be taken to ensure any new solutions are fit for purpose.  Our specialist team has a track record of over 22 years in this complex area.”

For further information on TIME Investments and its range of products, please visit www.time-investments.com

pros assist
AccountancyArticles

Not Just Your Accountants, But an Extension to Your Business!

Not Just Your Accountants, But an Extension to Your Business!

Pros Assist consists of a gifted team of qualified practicing members of the Institute of Financial Accountants, notably headed by the Director and Senior Financial Accountant, Alom Rouf. We profiled the firm and Alom to discover more about the innovative services that they provide to their clients.

With over 15 years of experience in private practice, advising sole traders and partnership clients alike, Alom leads the Pros Assist team in offering clients expert advice on a diverse range of business support, including guidance on business planning and funding, advising on project viability, as well as all matters relating to taxation and profit.

With such a diverse team, it enables Pros Assist to provide their clients with selection of specialist services which include; SME business advice, personal & corporate tax planning, financial analysis, company incorporation, bookkeeping & accounting and company secretarial & treasury to name just a few.

Throughout the years, Alom has gained a vast amount of experience in evaluating sole trader and partnership clients, to assess whether they would be better off incorporating. In addition to this, he advises clients on how to extract profits in the most tax efficient way. Also, Alom provides clients with a diverse range of business support, advising on project viability, business planning and funding. As the face of Pros Assist, Alom is a very professional, friendly, and approachable accountant.

The team pride themselves in being dedicated to their clients, ensuring all professional needs are taken care of to the highest standard. All members of staff are highly qualified with up-to-date training, as well as regulated by the Institute of Financial Accountants; to ensure that clients can be rest assured that they are in good hands.

One of the USPs at Pros Assist, is the proactive approach which they take in making themselves available at the client’s convenience. The team understand that SME business owners often work round the clock, so they make themselves available with ease of communication via, emails,
texts, and even social media. The teams mobile contact details are made available to the clients ensuring the highest level of care 24/7.

As for the firm’s three core strengths, these are:

• Flexibility: We make ourselves available when you are available 

• Reliability: All our staff are qualified and professionally trained with several years of experience. 

• Affordability: We work on a Fixed Fee basis, so what we quote you in the beginning is exactly what we charge you in the end.

Pros Assist specialise in business start-ups and looking after owner managed businesses. The firm offers all levels of financial assistance – whether you are looking to form your own company and don’t know where to begin, or you have some experience and want to make some changes, or if you simply require an all-round accountant to deal with all your business affairs.

Looking ahead to what the future holds for the firm, Alom and the team at Pros Assist will continue to provide their award-winning excellent advice and guidance to their clients, helping them to get their business off the ground and established in the industry.

 

Contact: Alom Rouf

Company: Pros Assist Highstone House, 165 High Street Hertfordshire, Barnet, EN5 5SU, UK

Telephone: 020 3697 0878

Web Address: www.prosassist.com

The Next Generation of Traders
Capital Markets (stocks and bonds)Stock Markets

The Next Generation of Traders

This new generation of traders is smart. Find out how traders have evolved with technology

James Mathews, CEO of Learn to Trade

The reality of trading taking place on the floor of the stock exchange, with traders shouting down telephones and punching in orders is long gone. As are the days of having to call your stockbroker and place an order. This perception might continue on TV, but the reality is that the modern trader is equipped with a mobile phone.

This new generation of traders is smart. Empowered by hyper-connectivity’s offer of unprecedented volumes of knowledge and 24/7 access to the market, they are tearing down societal constructs and preconceptions. This generation wants to be its own boss. Social media has become a platform to learn from, emulate and showcase success. Wealth creation has gone mainstream. With the millennial and Gen Z traders being some of the most enterprising members of our society, it’s little surprise that an entirely new generation of traders is now emerging. Characteristically, they are entrepreneurial and in many cases self-starters ready to follow their own paths. But, how has technology made trading and finance more mainstream to these generations?

Crypto as catalyst
The appeal of trading has in recent years been catalysed by the public’s fixation on cryptocurrency. With the allure of quick money, Bitcoin epitomised this fascination. Sage traders sceptically watched as this strange decentralised network of digital tokens became mainstream, while novices made their millions. Yet what goes up must come down, and once its value was done exploding, it started spectacularly falling. But with media hype and fabled success stories, the concept of crypto began to tempt casual observers. The ensuing rush to develop user friendly trading apps made the concept even more accessible to the everyday person.

Contributing to this has been the residual sour attitude toward the financial crisis. People have become more suspicious of and disillusioned with the “so called experts” entrusted with handling their hard-earned money. ‘They’ had nearly brought the global economy to its knees. Further backlash was also brought about from charging a lot of money to trade, whether it be pension funds or otherwise. This combination of discontent and new accessibility drove this new wave of do it yourself trading. 

Celebrity of social
Trading is complex. There’s jargon, complicated explanations, and understanding the thinking that went into a certain trading position can be almost impossible at times. Social media has changed all this too. Now there is an active, always online, accessible community of people to simplify, explain and advise. It’s easy to find out what’s going on in the market in seconds. And what’s more there is the celebrity, a new wave of Twitter traders, amateur and professional alike, who have established themselves as trading gurus to be followed, mimicked and aspired to.

The concept of “piggy backing” on other people’s trading is age old, but never before has it been so prolific. It’s proved to be extremely popular, both as a way of profiting from others’ expertise and as a way of learning. But new traders need to remember that sometimes you might be following a loser, and that making correct trades doesn’t always mean you’re being profitable overall.

Good bye 9 to 5
Trading’s popularity has risen along with the ‘side-hustle’, freelance, and sharing economy. Technology has without question been an enabling force behind all of these, as people strive for more reward and flexibility in their working lives. Indeed, there has been a concerted effort to break away from the traditional construct of 9 to 5. How trading maps to this is clear but it is not without risks. It can be seen to promise a lot, with some traders claiming to live off of one trade a day. However the reality the modern trader is facing is that it is just like any other employment in that it takes persistence, patience and grit. What it does offer though is autonomy and flexibility.

With the ever-increasing interest in the viability of pursuing a career in trading for the millennial and Z generations, an onus of responsibility has formed. We expect that in the next few years we will start to see the wider education focus shift, to start to cover money management and investment too. For far too many who missed out on this knowledge it seems like too little too late. Baby boomers now coming into retirement are left considering whether they have enough to see them through, or how they can manage their own account without having to pay people to do it for them. Increasingly, there will be more of a push from all demographics to have an entry point to the market. But with enough knowledge, experience and foresight to understand market volatility and risk anyone can trade with the technology out there and available to them.