Month: November 2019

Online banking
BankingCash ManagementPrivate BankingWealth Management

For UK Consumers the Front Door of a Bank is Now Its Mobile App, Not Its Physical Branch

Online banking

For UK Consumers the Front Door of a Bank is Now Its Mobile App, Not Its Physical Branch

 

72 percent of UK residents said they do the majority of their banking online and 77 percent consider switching to digital-only providers.

Marqeta, the first global modern card issuing platform, announced the results today of its new digital banking survey, which found that demand for physical bank branches continues to decline as digital banking platforms offer more seamless access to remote money management tools.

The research, conducted by Propeller Insights on behalf of Marqeta and surveying 800 UK and 1200 US consumers, found that 74 percent of consumers expect to use their mobile app regularly in the next three months, in comparison with just 22 percent who expect to visit a physical branch. The majority of respondents (77 percent) said that they will consider digital-only platforms when they next switch banks.

Most UK consumers (72 percent) also confirmed that they now complete almost all of their banking online, with the younger generation leading the way. Almost two-thirds (65 percent) of UK respondents aged 18-34 say they use a digital bank as either a primary or secondary banking option. Of those that use a digital bank in tandem with a traditional option, 56 percent of them said that they were more satisfied with the service provided by their digital bank. 

Trends in digital banking have also seen UK consumers make the switch to digital faster than their US counterparts. The survey found that:

• Only 21 percent of UK respondents, expect to visit a physical bank branch in the next three months, compared to 30 percent of US respondents.

• 72 percent of UK respondents said they do the majority of their banking online, while 62 percent of US respondents said the same. 

This confidence in utilising digital banking platforms is driving new expectations for innovation in the banking and fintech sector, as the vast majority of UK respondents (86 percent) say they want to see new technology from their bank in the future.

Marqeta’s survey also show that given how new digital banks are, consumers see the risk factor around digital banking as somewhat of an unknown. 51 percent of UK consumers said they felt like a digital bank was a riskier place to store their money, while 41 percent said they would limit how much money they deposited in a digital bank. 78 percent of UK respondents said they considered a bank’s security and reputation before giving them their business, with 30 percent saying that a lack of market track record was holding them back from making the move to a digital-only bank.

“This research demonstrates that UK consumers are ready to go digital with their finances, but digital banks still must work hard to innovate as we become an increasingly cashless, mobile-first society,” said Ian Johnson, Head of Europe at Marqeta. “Apps and payments cards account for an overwhelming majority of spending and money-management actions, and the rapid rise of new wave challenger banks is a major drive of this of this. At Marqeta we see the modern card issuing market being worth as much as $80 trillion globally by 2030, which is going to continue to create unprecedented demand for innovation and new offerings in banking.”

Issues

Q4 2019

Welcome to the Q4 edition of Wealth & Finance International Magazine. As always, every issue we endeavour to provide fund managers, institutional and private investors with the very latest industry news in the traditional and alternative investment spheres.

It wasn’t too long ago that the world seemed on the edge of an ‘imminent’ recession, escalated on the back of trade wars, Brexit uncertainty and unrest. While all of these are very much still a part of the daily news cycle, markets have remained resilient. Indeed, as of writing, we’ve just had one of the largest ‘Merger Mondays’ for some time. A good sign, even if the idea of a recession hasn’t exactly receded from view. The world ticks on. Deals are still secured. Business carries on regardless.

Within this issue we’ve spotlighted just a few of the last quarter’s deals, recruitment news, and the latest research from State Street Global Advisors.

Meanwhile, Aspen Consulting Team are our cover story for this edition of the magazine. In their own words, Thomas and Edgell Pules explain their exceptional work helping successful families flourish by addressing major financial and emotional concerns. Read inside to find out more.

Whatever the next decade brings, the world of wealth and finance will surely tick on, new deals with be created, new talent will emerge, and innovation will serve as the key to overcoming whatever challenges lie in wait.

Here at Wealth & Finance we sincerely hope that you enjoy reading this issue and, as always, we look forward to hearing from you.

ecommerce
FundsWealth Management

Five Ways To Compete With Bigger ECommerce Stores

ecommerce

Five Ways To Compete With Bigger ECommerce Stores

 

The eCommerce industry is fiercely competitive which can make it difficult to succeed. It is hard to compete with the bigger brands in your industry because they will have the reputation and visibility online to attract new customers, but there are a few key strategies that you can use which will help you to compete at a higher level and both attract and retain customers.

Once you are able to do this, your reputation should skyrocket which only makes it easier to get new customers and become one of the key players in your field.

Here are a few ways that you can compete with the bigger ecommerce stores:

1. Digital Marketing

The first and most important step to take is to increase your marketing efforts. As it is so competitive, this needs to be an area of investment so that you can benefit from greater results. Using SEO and PPC can deliver both long-term and short-term results so that you can immediately increase your visibility and garner more visitors to your store.

2. Improve Customer Service

Even in an online industry, consumers need to feel important and valued but even this is an area that the bigger brands can struggle with. Make sure that you are looking after your customers, responding to queries and complaints swiftly and thanking them for their custom. Additionally, it should be easy for them to contact you whether this is with live chat, on social media, via email or phone.

3. Analyse The Competition

A smart business owner will always keep a close eye on their competitors and learn from them. Identify the strengths and weaknesses of your competitors and find ways to use this information to your advantage to compete at a higher level. You can use reverse image search on your own products to find other stores selling the same item. This will help you to discover who your competitors are and enable you to carry out research.

4. Write Unique Product Descriptions

One area where larger ecommerce stores struggle is with product descriptions, as they often have so many products that they end up using the default description from the manufacturer. Creating unique, detailed descriptions can be effective for converting customers and increasing your visibility online. In addition to unique product descriptions, you could also use augmented reality apps, customer reviews and product videos to give visitors a much better sense of the product.

5. Adjust Pricing

Most consumers will compare products at a few different places before settling on an eCommerce store. Adjusting your pricing could help you to lure customers away from the competition and to your business, and a slight reduction should balance out with the increase in sales. Additionally, you also need to make sure that shipping is affordable as this is the primary reason for abandoned carts.

Hopefully, these tips will help your ecommerce store to start competing at a higher level and attract customers away from the bigger stores. It is fiercely competitive online but if you are intelligent and strategise, then it is possible to find success and challenge the bigger brands.

r&d
Corporate TaxTax

UK engineering companies are potentially missing out on £10 billion of R&D funding each year

r&d

UK engineering companies are potentially missing out on £10 billion of R&D funding each year

 

Engineering companies in the UK are potentially missing out on over £10 billion of R&D funding each year, new research has revealed.

The study, commissioned by innovation specialists MPA for Advanced Engineering 2019, found that one in five (21%) innovation active engineering firms are not taking advantage of the government’s R&D Tax Credit scheme, which allows companies to claim back up to 33p for every £1 spent on R&D activity.(1)

On average, engineering companies invest £386,000 a year on R&D activity, meaning they are potentially able to claim £100,360 in funding.(2) With over 100,000 UK engineering firms not claiming, despite describing their company as innovation active, a staggering £10.2 billion is going unclaimed each year.(3)

Reasons for not claiming the funding vary, but the most common answer given by engineers is that they don’t believe their companies are eligible (10%).

However, the research revealed that many engineering companies probably qualify without them realising. Some examples of indicative qualifying activities are, if your company develops new processes to improve efficiency, quality or performance; overcome unplanned technical difficulties or create bespoke solutions for clients.

Two-thirds (67%) of workers think that their firms are ‘innovation active’, which is the most accurate indicator that a company is eligible for the R&D Tax Credit scheme. Despite this, only a third (37%) say that their companies claim the available funding.

Another barrier blocking engineers from claiming is a lack of awareness about the initiative. Nearly a quarter (24%) of the surveyed engineers who aren’t claiming admitted that they didn’t even know that the scheme exists. Even among those who think they are innovation active, one in fourteen (7%) said that they were completely unaware of R&D tax credits.

While many are yet to take advantage of the scheme, engineering companies in the UK are planning on investing heavily in research and development. Over the next year, over one in five (22%) businesses in the industry are planning on spending over £1 million on innovative projects.

Nigel Urquhart, Senior Technical Analyst at MPA, said: “Engineering companies in the UK are respected all over the world for their quality and innovation, but a worryingly low number of them are claiming the R&D funding they are entitled to.

“Our research has highlighted that more work needs to be done to raise awareness of the R&D Tax Credit scheme, as these innovative companies could save themselves hundreds of thousands of pounds. This money could then be reinvested to fund further innovation, which would ensure UK engineering stays at the forefront of the industry.”

To see whether your company is eligible for the R&D Tax Credit scheme, visit: https://mpa.co.uk/services/rd-tax-credits/

[1] Survey of 250 UK engineers conducted by The Engineer on behalf of MPA in September 2019

[2] R&D tax credits calculator: https://mpa.co.uk/services/rd-tax-credits/

[3] Office for National Statistics: ‘Engineering Industry in the UK’ (December 2018) – there are 721,940 active engineering enterprises in the UK. 485,143 (67%) of these are innovation active. 101,880 (21%) of these innovation active companies are not claiming R&D funding: //www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/business/activitysizeandlocation/adhocs/009383engineeringindustryintheuk

crisps
ArticlesTax

Bras, rum and crisps – just some of the things the government has given tax relief on

crisps

Bras, rum and crisps – just some of the things the government has given tax relief on

 

Organisations of all shapes and sizes can benefit from R&D tax credit, providing tax relief on research and development costs and while you might think the work you’re doing doesn’t qualify, R&D tax credit specialist RIFT Research and Development Ltd has released some of the stranger cases they’ve worked on to highlight just how much of the UK’s output could qualify.

Drone technology for a humanitarian crisis

 

One engineering company set out to address the issue that 40% of vaccinations expire while still in the warehouses before they can be delivered and administered to those in need.

They set out to use drones to deliver medicine to remote regions in order to save money and lives and in doing so, found that the technology required was advanced, needing to include links with existing response solutions, ground controlled computers, autopilots and aerial surveillance.

The project went from a conceptual idea to a built and tested prototype and RIFT identified over £104,000 worth of qualify R&D costs over two claims in two years.

Plus-sized lingerie

One company that qualified for tax relief designs and manufactures plus size lingerie and swimwear, starting at bra size 36D, with the aim to flatter, accentuate and celebrate natural curves.

The founder used to struggle to find larger sized underwear and swimwear that offered the same boudoir appeal to smaller sized undergarments, so they brought garments to market that used high quality materials such as lace, soft satins and chiffon.
The company engaged in research & development to produce high quality, durable, comfortable and supportive bras that come in a range of materials, patterns and sizes.

RIFT identified £55,000 worth of eligible costs over two financial years that qualified for R&D Tax credit.

Guess who – facial recognition technology

The firm in question developed facial recognition software which better identifies forgeries.

The company collated a dataset of copied documents, including photocopied, manipulated, screen modified and superimposed examples.

These were combined with professionally forged documents that had been legitimately acquired to test out the technical uncertainties of the new detection solutions they developed. 

The systems were able to detect real identification documents and flag fakes. They can also verify that the photo within the ID matches the person claiming to own the ID.

RIFT identified over £1.07m of qualifying R&D expenditure in one financial year, even though many of the technologies were still at the prototype stage when the claim was submitted. 

Natural crisp flavours

The company produces crisps using locally sourced ingredients from the South of England which are hand-cooked and free from artificial ingredients. 

The manufacturer identified that few companies exist that make unique flavours of crisps using locally sourced ingredients, so it wanted to experiment with new flavours.  

Through a trial and error process, new ways of flavouring were found and tested with sample groups. 

Technical advances were made and technical uncertainties were resolved by the company with RIFT identifying £101,000 worth of eligible costs across two financial years that qualified for R&D Tax credit. 

Making traditional luggage using new methods

A 200-year-old brand used by Royalty and famous explorers worked on numerous projects to combine Victorian engineering with the latest technology, materials and processes.

The company collaborated with the most prestigious fashion houses and brands to make technologically advanced pieces while retaining that traditional feel.
RIFT identified over £1.037m worth of qualifying R&D costs over three claims covering four financial years.

Boutique Rum

Alternative rum flavours are increasing in popularity and demand, such as spices or coconut.

However, there were no established, open-sourced recipes, which meant that distilleries/fermenters had to develop their own by combining flavours and identifying the correct ingredient quantities, blends and alcohol levels.

The firm in question decided to develop a rum base which would have high quality coffee infused into its 5 year old golden rum.

After various tests and alterations to the recipe following feedback from bartenders and members of the public, the company increased the alcohol and flavour strength to produce a coffee rum liqueur that can be drunk straight or used in a cocktail.

RIFT identified £60,000 worth of eligible costs across two financial years that qualified for a R&D Tax credit.

Technical advances were made and technical uncertainties were resolved by the company in producing a cocktail in a matter of seconds instead of minutes.

Head of RIFT Research and Development Limited, Sarah Collins commented:

“Even though the R&D claim process was launched nearly 20 years ago, the number of companies failing to claim back R&D tax credit for their work is huge and this is largely due to nothing more than the fact they didn’t realise they could claim, or they had been incorrectly advised otherwise.

But as these examples show, there are a whole host of unconventional and wonderful things that qualify for R&D tax credits and so it’s always well worth looking into.”

R&D Tax Credits
Articles

Four Things Your Business Does That Qualifies You For R&D Tax Credits

R&D Tax Credits

Four Things Your Business Does That Qualifies You For R&D Tax Credits

 

When people think of research and development (R&D), they often picture large corporations or specialist science, tech or pharmaceutical companies. This explains why, despite the Government’s efforts to encourage innovation in UK industry through the introduction of R&D tax credits, only one in five (19%) of businesses that can be classed as being ‘innovation active’ have ever claimed money back for their time developing new products or processes.

This could be due to the complicated nature of processing the claims, as many business owners may not understand what qualifies as R&D or how to go about making a claim. To help companies to better understand the confusing world of R&D tax credits, industry expert Nigel Urquhart, Technical Analyst at MPA, has outlined four things businesses could be doing to qualify for R&D tax credits – simply by continuing the work you’re already doing.

Developing technically improved products

If you are a business that manufactures products and you’re constantly working to improve those products through research and experimentation, this qualifies as R&D. One surprising thing is that whether you’re successful or not in developing a new product doesn’t actually matter as, in the case of R&D tax credits, any time spent on the process still counts.

One company that has been successful in producing technically improved products and claiming R&D tax credits is Bee Lighting, which develops lighting for vehicles that are used on land, sky and sea. It has an innovative approach to work, investing in high design and engineering specialism to produce products that exactly meet a client brief for new bulbs. In one case, to create the right single small light for one client it developed and tested over 100 iterations of lens shape, 1000 frosting effects and four ways of fixing the lens. That led to a happy client, and the work that went into it qualified for a R&D tax rebate.

Is your business doing something similar?

Creating new systems or software to improve your quality of service

When businesses see a new software or manufacturing development that would enable them to improve their product or service, it’s common to look at ways of integrating that technical advancement into what they do in order to improve service quality. The good news is that if you’re doing that you could qualify for R&D tax credits.

One example of a business that has done this successfully is Logistex, a leading logistics integration company, which worked in collaboration with Pharmacy2U, a pioneer in digital healthcare, to design and develop an automated system to accurately pick, pack and dispatch both prescribed and over-the-counter medicines, at a rate of over 600 prescription orders per hour. The new system integrates a range of technologies, including pick to light, an automated packaging solution and automated twin headed dispensing robots; all of which presented technical challenges in development. Bringing these new technologies into its offering helps move the industry forward and enabled Logistex to claim R&D tax credits.

How are you bringing technical innovations into your business’ systems and processes?

Modifying existing systems to improve efficiency, capacity or performance

Almost every business, no matter which industry or market it operates in, will want to improve efficiency, capacity and performance. Looking at ways to improve this won’t only increase output, sales and, long-term, the profit of the business, it will also qualify the organisation for R&D tax credits.

Brainomix, a world leader in imaging software for neurological and cerebrovascular diseases, identified that a lack of timely, available expertise for brain CT scan interpretation can delay stroke patients from accessing life-saving treatments. Building on the systems that are already out there, it has since developed the CE-marked, award-winning stroke imaging software, e-ASPECTS. This modification to the existing CT scan helped support stroke physicians deliver fast, consistent diagnosis. However, organisations don’t need to be saving lives to qualify, they just need to show how the work they have done has improved performance.

What innovations are occurring in your business to improve the efficiency and performance of your staff or products?

Developing bespoke solutions for particular problems

Every client is different and there won’t be many businesses that haven’t been presented with a unique problem by a particular client. Principally of course, the work that goes in to developing solutions for a particular problem is to meet your client’s needs. However, it also has the added benefit that it makes you eligible for R&D tax credits.

One business that has been able to do this successfully is 48.3 Scaffold Design Limited, highly skilled structural engineers who design and develop scaffolding systems for commercial projects throughout the UK. It believes that it’s not about generic scaffold designs and want to create unique systems and challenging projects that develop new solutions. By taking this distinct approach and pushing the boundaries in its field, the business qualifies for R&D tax credits – like many others in the building sector which are looking for ways to improve current systems.

What bespoke projects is your business working on that could qualify for R&D tax credits?

Nigel Urquhart, Technical Analyst at MPA Group, adds: “In our experience, UK businesses are some of the most innovative in the world when it comes to advancing their products, systems and services. However, relatively few are aware that this entitles them to make huge savings when it comes to R&D tax credits. Of course, most businesses develop new products and processes simply to meet the needs of clients and customers, yet this quality of service doesn’t only help improve reputation, it could easily save them tens of thousands of pounds each year too.”

MPA Group is exhibiting at Advanced Engineering 2019. To find out more about the R&D Tax Credit incentive, visit: https://www.thempagroup.co.uk/rd-tax-credits/

van driver
ArticlesInsuranceWealth Management

Insurance Premiums Continue to Slow For Van Drivers

van driver

Insurance Premiums Continue to Slow For Van Drivers

 

Van drivers across the country are benefiting from a continued reduction to their insurance premiums, contradicting the industry’s prediction of premium increases in the wake of the Ogden rate change, new analysis from data analytics company Consumer Intelligence shows.

Its Van Insurance Index shows average premiums have fallen to £1,781 in the three months to September.

Since Consumer Intelligence started tracking insurance premiums five years ago, van insurance premiums have increased across the market by 34.4%, primarily driven by increased claims costs. The value of claims are increasing as more technologically advanced vehicles require higher repair costs, exacerbated amid Brexit uncertainty by the need to import parts for vehicles manufactured overseas.

Under 25s experienced a premium drop of 9.3% in the past year, yet average prices remain the highest at £4,673. Meanwhile, in the same 12-month period, a 2.4% price rise for the over-50s saw their average premiums increase to £581 annually. This compares to £843 for van drivers aged 25-49, who noticed their premiums nudge up by just 0.3% in the last 12 months.

Drivers operating their vans as a car substitute are benefiting from falling insurance premiums. A typical ‘social, domestic and pleasure’ policy today costs £1,691 – down 3.1% in the last 12 months.

Meanwhile, drivers using their vans for business have seen premiums rise 0.3% over the same period. An average ‘carriage of own goods cover’ now stands at £1,805.

John Blevins, Consumer Intelligence’s pricing expert, said: “Whilst claims costs continue to be one of the main drivers for premium changes in this market over the long-term, we are seeing premiums trending down over the last 12 months.

“It appears that the Ogden rate reset hasn’t had quite the impact some in the industry predicted. The price reductions over the last quarter have actually confounded many forecasts.”  

Brexit
MarketsRegulationSecurities

GDPR post Brexit and the impact on financial services

Brexit

GDPR post Brexit and the impact on financial services

By Ian Osborne, UK & Ireland VP, Shred-it

October 31st has been and gone. Yet despite the Prime Minister promising to deliver Brexit by this date, the UK remains part of the EU at least until January 31st 2020, following last week’s confirmation of the extension. And even then, it is still not clear exactly what will be, as MPs are interrogating the deal while preparing for a General Election on 12th December.

Like many industries, financial services have felt the effects of uncertainty surrounding if, how and when the UK will leave the EU. With London the epicentre for financial services in Europe, the wider potential impact is enormous.

The biggest fear amongst the business community has been that global companies will move their operations from the UK to other countries within the Eurozone.  Another cause for concern has been that companies will increasingly pause or divert investment in the UK, leaving Britain’s economy in stagnation.

On a more operational level however, there remain questions around EU regulations and how Brexit will impact financial services businesses from a regulatory perspective.  Take data protection, which was brought to attention last year with the introduction of the EU’s GDPR, and is today a big challenge for the industry.

According to data from the Ponemon Institute in 2017, financial services companies that experienced an information breach suffered the highest cost per capita than any other industry, at £154.  Furthermore, data left in insecure locations was the number one source of reported incidents in the finance sector in the UK (PwC for the ICO 2017).

Guidance from the Information Commissioners’ Office has recently confirmed that most of the data protection rules affecting businesses will remain the same post-Brexit.  The good news is that financial services companies that comply with GDPR and have no contacts or customers in the EEA (which constitutes EU countries plus Iceland, Norway and Liechtenstein) don’t need to do much more to prepare for data protection after Brexit.

However, organisations that receive personal data from contacts within the EEA must take additional steps to ensure they are fully compliant after Brexit, which may require designating a representative in the EEA.

Brexit aside, there remain questions as to how compliant with GDPR businesses are across the UK, despite it being a year since the legislation was introduced.  Financial services organisations that saw the introduction of GDPR as an opportunity to get their data-house in order and to improve the quality of the personal data they store are certainly reaping the benefits of last year’s GDPR efforts.

To assess the attitude of businesses in general, Shred-it commissioned a survey of 1,439 UK-based SMEs (under 500 employees) which found that 72 per cent of respondents said they were very aware of GDPR.

While this presents positive news, the biggest concern is whether that confidence in GDPR-readiness is justified. Less than half (45 per cent) of the firms who said they were ready to deal with data protection requirements also said they had reviewed their policies recently. Just over a third had contacted their customers to confirm consent to data use, less than a quarter had published a privacy notice, and just over two in 10 had reviewed, deleted or destroyed personal data.

These results suggest that businesses across all sectors – including financial services – need to take a more proactive approach to data protection.

So how can financial services firms ensure they are GDPR compliant?

Keep up to date with privacy laws

First things first. Businesses must stay up to date with privacy laws and understand what action – if any – they need to take to comply – particularly post-Brexit. Clear guidance is provided by the ICO website.

Customer communication has changed

Since the introduction of GDPR in 2018, financial services companies have had to rethink their strategies for communicating with customers. For example, customer e-marketing activities, such as newsletters, now require assessment post-GDPR and businesses must seek permission from customers to store their personal data and contact them with offers and promotions.

Protect your digital data

It’s important to remember that data protection refers to both digital information, as well as paper records. For digital data, financial services firms can take simple measures to ensure they are compliant with GDPR, including setting secure usernames, passwords and PINs for all devices, installing anti-virus software and a firewall on hard drives, avoiding posting confidential files on social media platforms, and avoiding opening files or links from an unknown sender.

Don’t forget paper records  

Not everything you collect, store, or handle is digital. When financial forecasts or year-end results are printed for a meeting, when reports or agendas are circulated for a meeting, they are at risk of getting into the wrong hands if they are not handled and disposed of properly and securely. Best practice should include the provision of locked confidential information consoles that are easily accessible, and company-wide policies that encourage a clean desk at night.

Business leaders should also be arranging for the secure destruction of documents after use or after prescribed periods of mandated storage, keeping only digital copies of essential files in an encrypted format.

Educate staff on data protection policy

In an industry that relies on privacy and confidentiality, the reality is that many information breaches happen not because of inferior firewalls or passwords, but because of employee error, negligence, or poor judgement. You may be doing everything you can but one employee, casually dropping a draft financial report into the recycling, can undo everything.

Finance services companies must have a strict policy on how to identify, handle and securely dispose of confidential information, that is communicated clearly to all employees and updated whenever necessary to avoid a potential breach.

Ian Osbourne
This article was written by Ian Osborne, UK & Ireland VP, Shred-it
R&D tax relief
Corporate TaxRegulationTax

Manufacturers top the R&D tax relief table – is your sector lagging behind?

R&D tax relief

Manufacturers top the R&D tax relief table - is your sector lagging behind?

Manufacturing firms claimed £1.25bn using R&D tax relief in the 2017-18 financial year, more than any other industry sector, a study from R&D tax credit experts, RIFT Research and Development reveals.

Manufacturing firms also made the highest number of claims over the period, at 11,925.

The R&D tax relief scheme is effectively Corporation Tax relief that can reduce a company’s tax bill and R&D specialists, RIFT, have dissected the latest industry data. This shows which sectors are submitting the most claims, the sectors being awarded the most in successful claims, and those that are bringing home the largest sums financially with just a single claim.

Other major users of R&D tax relief

Professional, Scientific & Technical firms came in second by amount, claiming £1.02bn annually. Behind that sector was Information & Communication (£820m), Wholesale & Retail Trade, Repairs (£235m) and Financial & Insurance firms (£215m). The smallest amounts claimed were from firms in Accommodation & Food (£5m), Real Estate (£10m), and Electricity, Gas, Steam and Air Conditioning (£10m).

Information & Communications rank high on number of claims

Information & Communication firms made 11,635 claims over the period, the second highest behind Manufacturing. Professional, Scientific & Technical firms were also responsible for 9,545 claims. There were only 125 claims for the Electricity, Gas, Steam and Air Conditioning sector, while there were just 215 claims by Real Estate firms. 

Mining & Quarrying dominate high value claims

The Mining & Quarrying sector has by far the largest average claim amount, at £1.16bn. However, despite the extremely high value, there were only 95 claims over the course of the year in that sector.

Other high value sectors per average claim were Financial & Insurance firms (£232,400), while third on the list was Arts, Entertainment & Recreation (£157,900). Once again Accommodation & Food was the smallest sector regarding claims (£21,700), while another comparatively low value sector was Wholesale & Retail Trade, Repairs (£44,000).

Head of RIFT Research and Development Limited, Sarah Collins commented:

“It’s been interesting to see how the dynamics of the research and development landscape have changed, as more and more companies from a wide variety of sectors have started to utilise the scheme.

“Of course, a sector like manufacturing is likely to provide more regular opportunities to further develop the practices being used through R&D and so it’s no surprise that it leads the way for both the total amount claimed and the number of claims. However, when it comes to the value of the claim, it can very much be a case of quality over quantity, with some of the less prolific sectors for overall claims contributing with some of the highest values of R&D tax relief.”

Sector League Table - £ amount claimed
Sector League Table - Number of claims
Ranking League Table - average £ per claim