Month: March 2020

bank
ArticlesBankingCash Management

Cold Shoulder From Banks As Hiring Freeze Puts Pressure On Cashflow For Recruitment Firms

bank

Cold Shoulder From Banks As Hiring Freeze Puts Pressure On Cashflow For Recruitment Firms

The Association of Professional Staffing Companies called for a more responsible approach from the banking sector as a survey of its membership painted a picture of demands for personal guarantees, offers of alternative loans to the Government backed Business Interruption Loan (CBIL) and inflated interest rates.

The survey, which questioned 120 recruitment firms found that over a third of businesses who felt that the CBIL could benefit their business either do not know how to access it; find the criteria prohibitive or the process too complicated and difficult.

“Banks are asking for personal guarantees from business owners as there also seems to be a tendency to try and sell you anything but the Government scheme” said one APSCo member while another said: “The terms appear to be arbitrary rather than qualified by the Chancellor. One bank is charging 12% with a threat to seize homes if repayment terms are not met.”

The survey also revealed that hiring is at a near standstill with 22% of recruitment firms reporting that permanent hiring is at zero and almost half (47%) reporting a decrease in hiring activity of 90%.

Two thirds of recruitment firms have had up to 25% of their contractors terminated in the last week; 15% have had up to 50% terminated and 17% have had up to 100% terminated.

Commenting on the results Ann Swain, Chief Executive of APSCo said:

“The banks have to be made to take a responsible approach so that firms can get access to the cash they need as the Chancellor intended. We are, along with the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, writing a joint letter to Government asking them to urgently review the banks approach so that this lifeline can be made available as soon as possible. The collapse in hiring activity has hit recruitment firms very hard not least because the furlough scheme does not cover those who have been made a job offer but who have not started. 

“This of course is understandable and we appreciate why the Government could not stretch its already generous package further. This does mean though that there will be many recruitment firms unable to invoice for work that they have already done which makes it even more important that they are able to rely on the banks to do the right thing.”

hsbc
ArticlesFundsStock Markets

How Clued Up Are You On The FTSE 100?

hsbc

How Clued Up Are You On The FTSE 100?

Brits incorrectly believe household favourites Tesco and Sainsburys are in the top 10 biggest companies of the FTSE 100, according to a new poll by IG Markets.

The trader polled 2,000 adults, alongside the launch of its Decade of Trade tool, to discover how clued up the general population are on the FTSE 100. The results show that as a nation we are fairly savvy when it comes to our knowledge of the stock market and over two-thirds (77%) are knowledgeable on the definition of shares.

Online trading platform, IG Markets, created the Decade of Trade tool to help Brits gain an understanding of the FTSE 100 and to allow traders to view not only how companies in the markets are performing now, but how they have performed over the last ten years. The tool covers twelve world markets including the FTSE 100, DAX40, ASX200 and HANG SENG.

When asked to name which companies are in the top ten of the FTSE 100 from a list, Brits identified eight out of ten businesses correctly. The mistakes came from thinking the supermarkets had a bigger presence than they do, with Brits believing Tesco (23rd in the FTSE 100) and Sainsburys (100th in the FTSE 100) to be in the top 10 market share.

 

Perceived top 10 of FTSE 100

Actual top 10 of FTSE 100

BP (+3)

HSBC

HSBC (-1)

Royal Dutch Shell A

GlaxoSmithKline (+4)

BP

Unilever (+6)

Royal Dutch Shell B

Tesco (+18)

AstraZeneca

British American Tobacco (+2)

Diageo

Royal Dutch Shell A (-4)

GlaxoSmithKline

Royal Dutch Shell B (-4)

British American Tobacco

Sainsbury (+91)

Rio Tinto

AstraZeneca (-5)

Unilever

 

Brits failed to identify beverage company, Diageo, whose brands include Smirnoff, Baileys and Guinness and mining corporation, Rio Tinto, as top 10 FTSE 100 companies.

Brits were also tested on their knowledge of the FTSE’s sector market share. The results showed there is a perception that Oil and Gas, Chemicals and Banks and Persona are the three largest sectors of the FTSE 100 when it is actually Oil and Gas, Banks and Persona and Household Goods.

Respondents were also asked what they perceive to have the biggest impact on the FTSE 100, and just over a quarter (27%) thought the Brexit referendum would have the biggest impact on the stock market.

 

Top five things Brits think have impacted the FTSE 100

  1. Interest rates (43%)
  2. Economic releases about earnings reports (35%)
  3. The Bank of England quarterly inflation report (27%)
  4. Brexit referendum (27%)
  5. Eurozone politics (26%)

 

Almost four in ten (39%) correctly thought all of the above factors have an impact on the FTSE 100.

To view the Decade of Trade tool, click here: https://www.ig.com/uk/special-reports/decade-of-trade

will
Family OfficesWealth Management

Disputing A Will: Key Considerations

will

Disputing A Will: Key Considerations

By Monika Byrska, Partner at Thomson Snell & Passmore

As a jurisdiction England and Wales is proud of its testamentary freedom.   Anyone can make a Will and in their Will leave whatever they own to whomever they want.   Not far away from us geographically, in the Channel Island of Jersey, testators can truly freely dispose of only a third of their estate.  Two thirds of their estate will be distributed to their closest family, whether they like it or not.   Similar “forced heirship” provisions exist in most continental jurisdictions.  We are not so restricted in England and Wales.  We can leave all we have to our favourite child, the “cats’ home”, or a neighbour.  However, are we as unfettered in our freedom as we think? 

Research published by Direct Line Life Insurance in 2018 suggested that over 12.6 million Brits would be prepared to go to Court to dispute a Will of a family member if they disagreed with the division of their estate.   Apparently, inhabitants of Southampton are most likely to dispute their loved one’s Will (31% of those surveyed).   They are closely followed by Londoners (29%) and Brighton residents (26%).   When it comes to contesting a partner’s Will, Brighton tops the tables – 16% of those surveyed would contest their partner’s Will if they were disappointed by it.   If the law gives us testamentary freedom, how and why can people argue over the provisions of our Will? 

Looking at my own practice, it seems to me that one of the most common reasons for people to have concerns over Wills is an allegation of undue influence.  Though in practice, evidentially, it is one of the most difficult grounds on the basis of which one can pursue a Will challenge, the concern that a Will was signed only because of the influence of the evil sibling, greedy carer or child, are stories I hear most often.   These cases are difficult, as how do you gather evidence of coercion that forms the basis of undue influence? By its very nature, coercion is always carried out in private, shielded from the prying eye of others, even those closest to the victim.  At the same time, because undue influence will often be tainted by a history of mental or sometimes physical abuse of the victim, when discovered, it is very difficult to just let it pass.  Undue influence challenges are often not cases only about the money, but about justice, which those close to the deceased wish to achieve. 

The second most common ground for Wills being challenged is an allegation of lack of capacity, i.e. a situation where the person making the Will was not of sound mind.   Does mental illness or neglect mean we cannot make a Will?  It need not do. However, for those disappointed by a Will, an insinuation that the deceased could not have possibly known what they were doing, because they were elderly, showing signs of dementia, will be enough to spark up a Will dispute. That is why it is so important that Wills, especially those which are likely to come as a disappointment for friends and relatives, and those prepared for the elderly or vulnerable, ought to be prepared professionally.    

In addition to the two most common grounds, Wills may be challenged on the basis of lack of knowledge and approval or lack of proper formalities (i.e. being wrongly signed or witnessed). Estates may also be challenged under the Inheritance (Provisions for Family and Dependants) Act 1975 by closest family: spouses, partners, children and dependants for whom “sufficient provision” in a Will has not been made.    

Despite the testamentary freedom we like to boast about, there are therefore legal routes allowing us to try and change the provisions of the Will of our loved one, after their death.  The trend is only upwards.  Looking at official court statistics the increase in the number of probate cases issued in the Business and Property Court of England and Wales was 24 % in 2017 (when compared to 2016), 30% in 2018 and 18% when comparing the first three quarters of 2019 with the same period in 2018. 

Millions of pounds are being spent on such disputes.  The financial and emotional burden that they bring on those bereaved may be reduced only if you involve a specialist early on; someone who will have the required experience, but who will also be ready to provide you with their honest, emotionally detached from the family feud, opinion. Law does create possibilities to impact how wealth will be distributed post-death.  However, those possibilities are limited and the courts will defend the English principle of testamentary freedom.  There are no better words to summarise the position than those of Deputy Master Arkush in one of his judgments (Rea v Rea [2019] EWHC 2434 Ch):

 “On one level it is understandable that the defendants feel disappointed, upset and resentful that they have not benefited from their mother’s will. In my judgment they have allowed these emotions to override a more considered reflection (…)[It] is not my task to decide whether the 2015 Will was justified or fair. I am only required to decide if it is valid…”

high street bank
ArticlesBanking

Do You Trust Your High Street Bank?

high street bank

Do You Trust Your High Street Bank?

With the likes of Goldman Sachs and National Savings & Investments (NS&I) cutting the interest rates on savings accounts, consumers are beginning to lose trust in the value of high street banking in the UK.

“Today, the biggest threat to savings isn’t market risk. It’s the fact that a majority of Britons feel that banks have not rebuilt public trust despite over ten years of restructuring since the 2008 financial crisis. The unhappiness of customers with their high street banks is becoming cliché,” says Granville Turner, Director at Company Formation Specialists, Turner Little.

“With mobile banking set to be more popular than visiting a high street bank by 2021, it’s no wonder that consumers are starting to look further afield when it comes to managing their finances. If an offshore investment makes you a better return, and doesn’t increase or even reduces your risk, then it makes perfect sense to invest. If the same investment also saves you money in taxes or allows you to take advantage of foreign economic conditions, then again, why would you not consider it?” adds Granville.

Offshore accounts are often multi-currency accounts, and can be opened by anyone over the age of 18. Whilst it’s often necessary to invest at least £500 or, in exceptional cases, £10,000 to open an offshore savings account, there are many that require a minimum deposit of just £1. A common perception is that some of the most common offshore accounts available to UK-based savers are in the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man, but this is not the case, and anyone considering an offshore account might be well advised to look further afield.

Offshore accounts are often available with both variable and fixed interest rates, and offer easy access to your funds. Whilst there are a number of strict checks in place to prevent offshore accounts falling foul of criminals who want to evade tax, opening an account is easier then it seems, providing you meet the minimum requirements set by the bank you choose.

“Whilst offshore accounts may not be for everyone, this rapid rate of technological change is set to continue over the coming decade, as people embrace the ever-widening number of ways to manage their finances, depending on their needs and lifestyle,” says Granville.

Mechanical Clock
ArticlesTax

Five World-Changing Inventions With Big R&D Claims Today

Mechanical Clock

Five World-Changing Inventions With Big R&D Claims Today

R&D tax credit specialists, RIFT Research and Development Ltd, have looked at five historic advancements that not only changed the world but would have eligible for some big R&D tax credit claims if they had come about today.

 

5. The Wheel

Perhaps the first invention that changed the course of mankind notably, the wheel enabled us to transport goods quicker and in greater quantities, while facilitating the birth of commerce and agriculture. Created in 3500 B.C., but only used on chariots some 300 years later in its primary function, the wheel doesn’t just help us to travel easier but it also has a wide array of other applications, such as its use within machinery.
Should the wheel be invented today through R&D it would qualify in the transport and storage sector and see an R&D tax credit claim total somewhere around £71,000.

 

4. The Battery

In the 1800s a lack of consistent electrical lines meant a consistent supply of power was non-existent. Then an Italian, Alessandro Volta, developed the first battery using zinc and silver discs placed alternatively to form a cylindrical pile. This new device produced a repeated number of sparks that could operate a number of devices without mainline power. Today, the battery has evolved through R&D and now almost every day to day electrical device relies on one with a focus on smaller sizes with longer battery life and the latest advancements coming through their use in cars to reduce pollution.
If invented today, the battery would qualify for an R&D tax credit claim of £80,000 within the electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning sector.
3. Semi-conductors
Not the sexiest invention but semi-conductors form the firm foundation for all electrical devices and are pretty much the cornerstone of the digital world. The first device to contain one was developed by Bell Labs in 1947 but should they have waited until today, their work would be in line for an R&D claim to the tune of £105,000.

 

3. Semi-conductors

Not the sexiest invention but semi-conductors form the firm foundation for all electrical devices and are pretty much the cornerstone of the digital world. The first device to contain one was developed by Bell Labs in 1947 but should they have waited until today, their work would be in line for an R&D claim to the tune of £105,000.

 
2. Mechanical Clock

Our ability to tell time is pivotal to the way we live and work and without clocks to help us we would be living in a world of unorganised chaos. The clock was technically an R&D advancement on the sundial but when Yi Xing created the mechanical clock in China in 725 AD it would be the first that was widely accessible within society and would go on to change the world dramatically.

Today Yi Xing’s work would be in line for a £107,000 R&D tax credit claim within the professional, scientific and technical sector.

 
1. Penicillin

Last but not least, Penicillin is probably the most important medical advancement of years gone by that would qualify for an R&D tax credit claim today. Discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928 and then researched and developed over the following 20 years, the drug revolutionised the way we treat a wide array of medical problems and helps fight infection without causing us harm in the process.

Like the clock, if invented today Alexander could have submitted an R&D tax claim of £107,000 for his work within the professional, scientific and technical sector.

 

Director of RIFT, Sarah Collins, commented:
“R&D has been changing the world before the term was even coined and in these cases, the impact of the developments made have changed the human race and created the modern world as we know it.

Of course, had these advancements been made today, the work carried out to develop them would have qualified for a pretty chunky claim where R&D tax credits are concerned. Instead, the government’s R&D pot of gold will have to remain for those making modern-day improvements in their respective sectors in today’s world.”

money loss
ArticlesRisk Management

Emergency Measures Called For To Support Insurers And Organisations Buying Cover

money loss

Emergency Measures Called For To Support Insurers And Organisations Buying Cover

  • Most Coronavirus linked losses will be uninsured, but investment profits for insurers have fallen dramatically – exacerbating hard market conditions
  • Insurance premiums set to rise, some insurers will withdraw cover, and more exclusions will be included in policies
  • This could lead to a major long-term shift in which risk is transferred back to companies, further limiting their activities as they attempt to manage their response to the ongoing economic disruption

Mactavish, the leading independent expert on commercial insurance procurement and dispute resolution, is calling for the Government to consider introducing Coronavirus related emergency measures to support insurers and organisations buying cover – especially those facing renewals in the next few weeks.

It says that without this, the impact of Coronavirus could have a significant impact on insurers over the medium-to-long-term.  However, this is not because of claims linked to the virus, but because of the effect of the losses insurers have incurred in their investment businesses.  It warns this could lead to premiums rising dramatically, insurers pulling out of sectors and classes of business, and an increase in claims being rejected along with payment of settlements being slowed down.  All which will worsen an already severe expected recession.

Mactavish is calling on the Government, insurers, brokers, business trade bodies and other relevant parties to enter into a dialogue about possibly introducing the following measures:

  • Insurance premium tax – which is currently 12% –  be temporarily suspended
  • The government should consider providing
  • cheap loans/funding to insurers to help support their cash flow/reserves
  • Insurers should temporarily freeze any increase in insurance rates
  • Insurance renewals should be automatic
  • Government should loosen its capital requirements on insurers
  • The Government should explore ways to compensate insurers from any losses incurred from these measures

 Mactavish believes the value of insurance claims paid out as result of the impact of Coronavirus will be much smaller than many predict because it will predominantly fall outside of traditional “Business Interruption” insurance. To be insured against the virus, organisations would have had to opt in for ‘contagious disease’ extensions on their policies, which very few do.  Even if they did do this, almost all such extensions are limited in both the range of diseases covered and the financial limit of cover as well as being subject to a wide range of conditions – which means very few offer any real protection in a situation such as this.

The bigger issue facing insurers is the losses they are continuing to suffer as a result of ongoing capital market falls and interest rate cuts.

Bruce Hepburn, CEO, Mactavish said: “In recent years, insurers have increased their riskier asset classes, in addition to their traditional investments in low risk corporate and sovereign bonds, many of which are increasingly returning low yields. Partly as a result of this decline in yields, insurers have tended to move away from long-term debt towards short-term gilts which must be rolled over more frequently. In addition to this, they have also increased their exposure to illiquid assets such as private equity and infrastructure, making it more difficult to manage their reserves and cash flow.

“For insurers, the impact on the investment landscape will be more pronounced than Coronavirus itself. It could see insurers increase their premiums to recoup poor returns and improve their cash reserves, reject more claims, slow down the process of settlements, and stop providing cover in certain markets. They may also include more restrictions on the policies they do underwrite”. Bruce Hepburn said: “The overall impact of coronavirus on the insurance sector could be more devastating than 9/11.

“We predict that insurers will now move to a model in which their businesses are primarily sustained by underwriting profits, rather than the traditional combination of underwriting and investments.”

“Prior to the emergence of Coronavirus, insurers were already coming under considerable pressure and we were already seeing the classic symptoms of a hard market. Coronavirus has just made this situation worse. In the long run, this could herald a seismic transfer of risk back onto companies who will in turn be forced to allocate more of their own capital to protecting themselves against high-severity losses, limiting their activity and ability to create returns for shareholders.”

“Given all of this we are calling on the Government to find ways to provide financial support for insurers and help alleviate any increase in premiums at a time when businesses are increasingly struggling to survive.  On a short-term basis, with the right support from the government, insurers could also offer to freeze premium increases for the short-term.” 

tax claim
TaxWealth Management

R&D Tax Credit Claims Could Pay 178k UK Salaries For A Year

tax claim

R&D Tax Credit Claims Could Pay 178k UK Salaries For A Year

While growth in R&D tax relief claims has increased by 35% annually since inception in 2001 to over £4bn last year the scheme is yet to be fully utilised by UK business according to R&D specialists RIFT Research and Development Ltd. 

However, even with many remaining unaware that the work they are doing could qualify, the number of claims made does demonstrate the huge amount of innovative work taking place across the UK.

To highlight this great work and put the sums claimed into perspective, RIFT has looked at how many people this sum could employ based on the average annual net salary and which region is top when it comes to R&D Tax Credit claims.

The research shows that there has been a huge £4.3bn claimed across all R&D tax credit schemes to date and with the average net salary currently sitting at £24,365, that’s enough to pay the wages of 177,711 for a whole year!

As you might expect, London is home to the largest number of claims with £1.2bn submitted and even with the higher annual salary of £31,567, the R&D work going on throughout the capital could employ 39,281 for a year.

R&D claims in the South East and East of England have accumulated enough to pay the annual wage for 30,109 and 21,863 people respectively. 

The West Midlands, North West and South West have also seen R&D claims total enough to pay the wage of over 10,000 people for a year. 

Northern Ireland and the North East have seen the lowest amount claimed, but with a similar average wage and claims totalling £75m and £85m, the great work going on in these areas could still pay the average annual salary for between 3,5000 and 4,000 people.

Location / Region

Amount claimed – All Schemes (2017-18)

Average NET annual salary (2019)

Number of people R&D credit claims could employ at average salary

London

£1,240,000,000

£31,567

39,281

South East

£810,000,000

£26,902

30,109

East of England

£555,000,000

£25,385

21,863

West Midlands

£395,000,000

£22,622

17,461

North West

£275,000,000

£22,510

12,217

South West

£225,000,000

£22,293

10,093

Yorkshire and The Humber

£175,000,000

£21,862

8,005

East Midlands

£180,000,000

£22,509

7,997

Scotland

£175,000,000

£23,207

7,541

Wales

£95,000,000

£21,399

4,439

North East

£85,000,000

£21,484

3,957

Northern Ireland

£75,000,000

£21,468

3,494

    

UK overall

£4,330,000,000

£24,365

177,711

Director of RIFT Research and Development Ltd, Sarah Collins, commented:

“R&D tax credits are a great way of paying back those companies that are committing to some outstanding work in their respective fields and regardless of how small the developments being made, they are all contributing to the future of their sectors and UK business as a whole.

While many of us are very aware of this, we wanted to put into context just how much the claims being submitted equate to when you consider an everyday part of life like the average wage. 

However, there is still so much great work that isn’t being recognised in terms of its qualification for R&D tax credits and while it’s staggering to think R&D claims could fund 178,000 peoples wages for a year, we also wanted to highlight this huge Government cash pot to those that aren’t currently claiming but should be.” 

Sources: Gov.uk and ONS.

Sweden
Cash ManagementWealth Management

Sweden Set For Dramatic Growth In Digital Wealth Management

Sweden

Sweden Set For Dramatic Growth In Digital Wealth Management

Nucoro, the London based fintech company providing bespoke investment and savings technology focused on delivering digital investment solutions to third parties, believes Sweden is set to see huge growth in its digital wealth management sector.

It believes there are three key factors driving this – a rapidly growing population of mass affluent and high net worth individuals; the fact that a significant percentage of Sweden’s workforce are employed in the technology and the telecommunications sectors, and the country’s huge and growing focus on fintech.

Growing population of mass affluent and high net worth individuals

Analysis of industry data by Nucoro reveals that 7% of people in work in Sweden earn over $90,000 a year or 906,000 Swedish Krona (SEK).(1) It’s analysis also reveals a growing pool of wealthy people in Sweden, many of whom Nucoro believes are increasingly open to using digital wealth management services.(2) There were around 200,500 millionaires in Sweden in 2018, and this is set to rise to 245,000 (an increase of 22%) by 2023. In terms of those Swedes worth $30 million or more, there were around 3,820 with this level of wealth in 2018, and this is expected to rise to 4,700 – an increase of some 25% – by 2023.

 

HNWs and the technology and telecommunications sector

Nucoro’s analysis of industry data reveals that around 16% of Sweden’s wealth is derived from the technology and telecommunications sectors.(3) This is one of the highest percentages of any country, and it means that many Swedes are comfortable using digital wealth management services. 

 

Strong focus on fintech

Sweden was one of the earliest adopters of technology in financial services, and this is reflected in its fintech sector, which attracted a record investment last year. Sweden’s fintech sector saw investment of €778 million in 2019, the seventh largest amount of any country in the world, and in Europe only the UK and Germany received more.(4)

Stockholm has one of the most thriving fintech scenes in Europe. It has 114 banks and nearly 400 fintech companies. Some 18% of the Swedish capital’s citizens are employed in the tech sector, and the most common job in Stockholm is a programmer. (5)

Nikolai Hack, COO Nucoro said: “Sweden is an incredibly attractive market for the digital wealth management sector. Over the next few years, we expect to see a rapidly increasing number of services in this area being launched to cater for a growing pool of people who are comfortable using digital platforms to manage their investments and wealth.

“We are keen to work with both traditional and non-traditional financial services companies in Sweden to help them develop propositions in this area.”

From client onboarding to portfolio construction through to billing, Nucoro combines all the tools required to build the next generation of savings and investment propositions. To help financial services companies move forward, Nucoro offers a new technology-based foundation built without legacies – a complete overhaul to the models of client service and accessibility. It offers a radically different approach to the relationship between technology providers and the organisations adopting their solutions.

Nucoro offers a fully automated, AI-powered wealth management platform to UK retail investors called Exo Investing.  Within the first year of operation, Exo won two industry awards (Best digital wealth manager OTY + Industry Innovator OTY at the AltFi awards 2018), was named as a finalist in three more and selected to two disruptive company annual indexes (Wealthtech 100 and Disruption50’s 100 most disruptive UK companies).

Nucoro is making this technology available for financial services companies based in Sweden that have the ambition to truly innovate and future-proof their businesses – and are struggling to realise their digital ambitions.

(1) https://www.averagesalarysurvey.com/sweden
(2) Nucoro analysis of Knight Frank Wealth Report 2019
(3) Global Data: ‘Wealth in Sweden: HNW Investors 2018’
(4) Innovate Finance: January 2020
(5) Invest Stockholm: Stockholm Fintech Guide

credit score hotspots
BankingWealth Management

MoneySuperMarket Reveals The UK’s Credit Score Hotspots

People living in the Eastern Central London postcode (EC) have the highest average credit scores in the UK, according to the UK’s leading price comparison site MoneySuperMarket.

Analysis of over 200,000 credit reports from MoneySuperMarket’s Credit Monitor1 reveals that those in the EC area have the highest average credit score at 583 out of a possible 710 points – 21 points higher than the UK average.

According to MoneySuperMarket data, the Surrey town of Guildford has the second highest average score across the UK – 13 points higher than the average score in London (565).

 

Postcodes with the highest credit scores:

Location

Average Credit Score

EC – Eastern Central London

583

GU – Guildford

578

KT – Kingston upon Thames

577

RG – Reading

W – Western London

576

E – East London

RH – Redhill

575

 

By contrast, residents in the north of England and parts of Scotland have some of the lowest credit scores in the country. Sunderland (548), Wolverhampton (549) and Kilmarnock (550) are the three lowest scoring postcodes. 

 

Postcodes with the lowest credit scores:

Postcode

Average Credit Score

SR – Sunderland

548

WV – Wolverhampton

549

KA – Kilmarnock

550

DN – Doncaster

550

HU – Hull

551

 

Sally Francis-Miles, money spokesperson at MoneySuperMarket, commented: “Although your credit score isn’t directly impacted by where you live, our research shows those with an EC postcode are the top credit scorers in the UK and are therefore likely to be most highly rated by lenders.

“What will strengthen your credit score is making sure you are registered on the electoral roll – it’s easy to do too. Using a credit card can also help. It doesn’t automatically improve your credit rating, but if you repay the balance in full every month, it shows lenders that you are reliable and credit worthy.

“Additionally, free-to-use monitoring services, such as MoneySuperMarket’s Credit Monitor, offer personalised tips to help increase your credit rating.”

 

MoneySuperMarket’s top tips for improving your credit rating include:

-Debt repayments – keep on top of repayments for loans, mortgages and credit cards
Avoid multiple credit cards – having credit cards that are no longer used can have a negative impact on your credit score
-Ensure a sensible use of credit – try not to use a high proportion of the available limit to avoid appearing over-reliant on credit

For more tips and information, visit MoneySuperMarket to see if your area falls into a credit score capital of the UK.

Issues

Q1 2020

Welcome to the Q1 edition of Wealth & Finance International Magazine. As always, every issue we endeavour to provide fund managers, institutional and private investors with the very latest industry news in the traditional and alternative investment spheres.

It’s been an odd couple of weeks. Following a terrible (to put it lightly) few days for global stock markets, the last 24 hours has seen a dramatic rallying turnaround. While we’re probably not at all out of hot water when it comes to the economic impact of COVID-19, recovery in any form is certainly a pleasant sight. But, as always, we step gingerly onward, wary of further disruption. Ultimately, uncertainty and risk are just a natural part of the wealth and finance landscape.

Saying that, this quarter’s edition features companies who combat uncertainty through next-level preparedness, employing technology in new ways to cover all basis. From the development of true AI, to funds that beat all expectations, this issue focuses on excellence that thrives despite greater difficulty.

Here at Wealth & Finance we sincerely hope that you enjoy reading this issue and, as always, we look forward to hearing from you.

How to Deal with Malpractice Claims
Due DiligenceInsuranceRisk Management

How to Deal with Malpractice Claims

We all make mistakes. However, as a doctor or other medical technician, a mistake from one of these professionals can be incredibly damaging. Sometimes we do not even make mistakes, but patients will still file potentially damaging malpractice claims. Here are some of the best paths to follow if you do receive a malpractice claim from a former patient.

Keep Calm

Your first instinct will no doubt be to panic about the situation. However, this is unlikely to help you. You instead need to focus on making things right. It can be difficult to put your feelings aside so you can try to improve things. Make sure you explain to your friends and family what has happened so they can support you through the process.

If you a private medical professional, you should have insurance to help you out in such a scenario. An indemnity insurance policy is designed to protect you from negligence suits like these. Protect yourself and get the right insurance for your career here: https://incisionindemnity.com/

Gather Your Own Evidence

If you think the claim might have been filed falsely, you should do everything in your power to fight it. Make sure you consult a lawyer who specialises in these types of malpractice suits. The more knowledgeable you are, the better position you will be in to fight this claim.

The evidence is going to be a key part of this. Try to gather information about what you recommended as treatment and the path they should have followed. Make sure you include any notes you made during the appointments the patient they had. Even something that might seem inconsequential might be what you need to get the claim thrown out.

Be Sincere and Understanding

Even if the case comes out in your favour, the claimant might have had their life seriously affected by what has happened to them. Likewise, your reputation might become quite damaged by the claim, especially if the claimant decides to take it to the press.

However, you should instead try to stay as gracious as possible throughout the whole process. If you are seen to be sympathetic and genuinely sincere in your actions, it will serve you much better than if you are cold and withdrawn. Acknowledging that you have had an effect on this person’s life, even if they are later proven to be lying, will always be the better path to take.

Keep Business Running as Usual

You will still have a business to run even when fighting a malpractice suit. It cannot become neglected as that might result in many more suits. Though it can be very difficult to do, you need to make sure you are as focused on your business as ever.

Try to complete each new patient to the same standard and level of care as you always have. Just by delivering a stellar experience at your surgery, you might be able to dispel some of the rumours swirling around you. Sometimes, it is just simple changes like this that can really help you as you try to keep things going as normal.

A malpractice suit can be incredibly difficult to fight but there are ways to do so. As difficult as it might be, you need to make sure that you keep your head above water and continue as usual. Gather evidence, make sure your insurance is valid, and get some good legal advice. It is entirely possible to defend yourself through a medical malpractice suit if you make the right choices. Before you know it, you could be back to serving patients happily once more.