Category: Cash Management

Martin Lewis
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Martin Lewis Financial Education Textbook Rolled Out to 700 Schools Across the UK

Martin Lewis
Photo credit: The Money Saving Expert 

Martin Lewis Financial Education Textbook Rolled Out to 700 Schools Across the UK

The first ever financial education textbook to hit Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales will be rolled out over the next 15 months.

This week, Young Money announced the launch of the first ever financial education textbook to hit schools in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Over 45,000 books will be sent free to schools over the next 14 months, as well as an accompanying teacher’s guide (available digitally). The textbook will also be available as a free PDF download to anyone who wants it.

This launch follows the successful roll-out of the textbook in England. In November 2018 340,000 copies of the very first financial education textbook in the UK, ‘Your Money Matters’, were delivered into English secondary schools. This was funded by Martin Lewis, the Money Saving Expert, with a personal donation of £325,000 to the financial education charity Young Money to develop and distribute this milestone resource and accompanying teacher’s guide.

Aimed at supporting the financial capability of those aged 15 to 16, the reality is that the textbook has been used across multiple year groups and within a wide range of subject areas.

Since being delivered into every state-funded secondary school in England, the Money and Pensions Service funded an evaluation of the impact that Your Money Matters has had:

• 89% of teachers said that Your Money Matters would improve the quality of financial education in their schools.

• 88% of teachers said the textbook would increase their confidence to deliver financial education.

Subject Head at a Community school, said:

‘Excellent resource! Much needed for youngsters. We are very grateful to have received the textbooks and received excellent feedback from students. One student told me that our Financial Capability lessons changed the way her parents look at finances and motivated them to change the way they deal with money as a family.’

A Year 12 student, commented:

‘It’s so broad as well – if you want a general outline it is perfect for that. I actually brought one home so I could look through the university stuff. My older brother wanted to know about a work pension… I said ‘I have this textbook’ so he looked at that. He found it useful – it had the general information that he needed.’

Following the success that Your Money Matters has received in England, the Money and Pensions Service and Martin Lewis are splitting the cost of the £368,000 project, funding Young Money to develop versions of the textbook for Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. State-funded secondary schools in each nation will receive both printed and digital copies of their textbook over the next 14 months:

Northern Ireland – January 2021 (12,000 copies in total)

Scotland – March 2021 (21,500 copies in total)

Wales – September 2021 (12,500 copies in total)

What is in the textbook?

The educational textbook contains facts and information as well as interactive activities and questions for the students to apply their knowledge. The chapters are as follows:

1. Savings – ways to save, interest, money and mental health
2. Making the most of your money – budgeting, keeping track of your budget, ways to pay, value for money, spending
3. Borrowing – debt, APR, borrowing products, unmanageable debt
4. After school, the world of work  student finance, apprenticeships, earnings, tax, pensions, benefits
5. Risk and reward – investments, gambling, insurance
6. Security and fraud – identify theft, online fraud, money mules

Whilst the key financial topics will remain largely the same, a review in each nation, consisting of focus groups with teachers and devolved government representatives for education, is being conducted to identify the amendments required. This will ensure that the textbook in each nation maps to the respective education curriculum as well as taking into account the specific needs and financial legislation in each country.

Once complete, up to 75 copies will be delivered for free into every secondary school in each nation.

Why do we need the textbook?

Financial education is part of the national curriculum for every nation in the UK. Whilst integrated into each curriculum in different ways, it is an important part of secondary school education. Various pieces of research have identified that teachers’ confidence in delivering financial education is relatively low – there is little training provided to support this – and the degree to which young people receive financial education in school is hugely variable.

The textbook addresses this by covering key financial information in a relevant and engaging way for students. To accompany the textbook there will be an online teacher’s guide which will support teachers in each nation to use the textbook to enrich their own financial education provision in a variety of ways.

There is a strong need to help young people understand financial matters. For example, fewer than three in ten 14 to 17-year-olds plan ahead for how they’ll buy things they need, and one in ten 16 to 17-year-olds have no bank account at all. Gaining knowledge and confidence in financial issues is crucial to leading to better decisions now and in later life.


Martin Lewis, founder of MoneySavingExpert (though donating in a personal capacity) comments
:

“The pandemic has shown the lack of personal financial resilience and preparedness of the UK as a whole. Not all of that can be fixed by improving financial education, but a chunk of it can. Of course, we need to educate people of all ages, yet young people are professionals at learning, so if you want to break the cycle of debt and bad decisions, they’re the best place to start.

I was one of those at the forefront of the campaign to get financial education on the national curriculum in 2014, and we celebrated then thinking the job was done. We were wrong. Schools have struggled with resources and there’s been little teacher training. Something else was needed to make it easy for schools and teachers. So even though I questioned whether it’s right that a private individual should fund a textbook, no one else would do it, so I put pragmatics over politics and did it in 2018.

I’m delighted that now we’ve proved the success of that book in England. The Money and Pensions Service has agreed to team up to provide this much-needed resource for the rest of the UK’s nations – adding a rightful sense of officialdom to the whole project.”


Sharon Davies, CEO at Young Money and Young Enterprise comments
:

“We are thrilled that Young Money is able to develop the Your Money Matters textbook for every UK nation. Financial education is critically important for all young people, and it is fantastic that the difference this has already made within England can now be extended to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. We look forward to working with our partners in each of these nations over the next year.”

Sarah Porretta, Strategy and Insights Director at the Money and Pensions Service comments:

“We know that learning about money when we’re young can have a direct impact on the ability to manage money later in life. However, too many young people are entering adulthood without being prepared for the money-related challenges that lie ahead.

The launch of the Your Money Matters textbook in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland is a vital step towards more teachers having the confidence, skills and knowledge to teach financial education. As part of our UK Strategy for Financial Wellbeing, we want to see a further 2 million children and young people getting a meaningful financial education so that they become adults able to make the most of their money and pensions.”

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ArticlesBankingCash Management

How Millennials Can Get Ahead With Their Money

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How Millennials Can Get Ahead With Their Money

Millennials are often painted as globe-trotting creatures that spend more money on avocadoes than their future. But that can’t be further from the truth. Millennials tend to be good savers, at least compared to other generations. Industry data shows that more than 70% of millennials have started putting money away for retirement and beyond.

“Millennials still struggle with investing. Often because they feel they don’t know enough about the market, but it’s never too late to invest in your understanding. It’s a great way to make your finances work harder for you,” says Granville Turner, Director at company formation specialists, Turner Little.

Here are some things you can start doing now, or preparing for, to set yourself up for a future of learning and investing:

 

Start early

The most apparent advantage millennials have over older generations is the luxury of time. Whilst everyone can weigh up the risks and rewards of investing, you’re particularly well-placed to see a solid return on your investments.

 

Challenge risk

When you invest money for longer, you can become less phased by the ups and downs and be able to view inevitable declines as opportunity instead. It’s better to look at yearly or even longer figures for a more accurate reflection of performance.

 

Put your money to work

Money that sits in a savings account, uninvested, is almost certain to lose value over time due to inflation, or a creeping higher cost of goods and services. If your money is growing or earning you a return, it’s going to help you reach your financial goals faster.

 

Start small

Many millennials believe you need to have a serious amount of money to start investing. But in reality, even small contributions can build over time. The important thing is to start early, and make it a habit.

If you’re ready to start having the right conversations about the future of your finances, get in touch with us today. With years of knowledge and expertise, we’ll be able to assist with any enquiries, no matter how complex.

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ArticlesBankingCash ManagementWealth Management

Mapped: The UK’s Highest and Lowest Credit Score Hotspots

UK credit score

Mapped: The UK’s Highest and Lowest Credit Score Hotspots

The south is home to eight of the top ten areas with the highest credit scores in the country according to new analysis by Share to Buy.

Using the latest data from two major credit agencies, Share to Buy have mapped out the UK’s average credit scores by county showing where the country’s best scorers live, and who currently tops the national average of 570.

According to Google search data, interest around loans peaked between March and June 2020, with the phrase ‘can I get a loan’ rose by 11% compared to the same period last year, while the phrase ‘how to improve credit score’ was up by almost 27% since 2019.

UK credit score

The above image shows the England’s highest and lowest credit score hotspots rated out of 1699. 

Oxfordshire comes in at the top with a score of 1258, whilst Lancashire is bottom with 1132.

Top Five: Highest Credit Scores in the Country

Oxfordshire has the highest average credit score in the country, over two and a half times the national average of 570 and 154 points higher than Nottinghamshire, the area with the lowest credit scores in the UK.

 

Highest Credit Score Areas

Total Score out of a possible 1699

1

Oxfordshire

1258

2

Surrey

1255

3

Dorset

1239

4

Hampshire

1236

5

Berkshire

1236

Bottom Five: Lowest Credit Scores in the UK

All counties analysed have higher credit scores than the national average, but some areas in the UK lag behind their neighbours.

 

Lowest Credit Score Areas

Total Score out of a possible 1699

1

Nottinghamshire

1104

2

County Durham

1112

3

Leicestershire

1117

4

Yorkshire

1119

5

Lancashire

1132

What Impacts a Credit Score Positively

Several factors can impact credit scores throughout our lives. Registering to vote is an excellent place to start, as most credit scoring companies use this to help confirm your identity and address. Three ways to impact your Score positively include:

1. Set up direct debits where possible: Consistent, regular payments look good on your profile, so try to set up direct debits for as many payments as you can to ensure you pay on time and in full regularly. 

2. Maintain older accounts: The average age of your bank account is taken into consideration by credit scorers, so try to stick to one account that can be well managed over the long-term.

3. Don’t borrow more than you can afford: Always ensure you can meet minimum repayments easily, and pay off accounts sooner if you can. This shows you can manage within your set limits.

 

What Impacts a Credit Score Negatively

Credit scorers look for certain red flags when assessing your eligibility. Here are a few things you should try to avoid:

1. Missing payments: If this happens regularly, you could have a potential default flagged on your profile, and this can stick around for up to six years.

2. Lending beyond your means: Borrowing more than you can afford means sticking with repayments will be tricky, and when debt piles up, it can quickly become unmanageable. If you get a debt relief order or apply for bankruptcy, your credit score will be significantly impacted.

3. Regularly applying for credit: Each time you apply for credit, lenders will perform a ‘hard’ search on your credit history, and this is logged on your profile. If too many of these are logged, it could become a possible red flag.

 

Commenting on their average credit score analysis, Nick Lieb, Head of Operations at Share to Buy says:

“Many people have been asking us what constitutes a good credit score when trying to buy a home. The topic is more relevant than ever right now as we navigate our way through the uncertainty of the last few months, but with so many variables, and credit score companies all calculating scores differently, it’s not an easy question to answer.

We have combined data from two of the biggest agencies for our credit score review, and while it’s interesting to see the variation in numbers, average credit score is just one of several factors that play a part in your ability to get a mortgage. Therefore, even if your credit score is not where you want it to be, this shouldn’t be a deterrent in your search for a home”.

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BankingCash ManagementPrivate BankingPrivate Funds

10 Minute Money Challenges to Get Your Finances in Order

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10 Minute Money Challenges to Get Your Finances in Order

Auditing finances can sometimes feel like a huge chore, and things may have been forgotten about or pushed to the bottom of the to-do list during the pandemic. This guide by KIS Finance has listed some very easy and quick 10-minute money challenges that people can do in order to get their finances back on track if things have started to get out of control.

Check your direct debits and standing orders

A great place to start is by checking through all of your direct debits and standing orders to make sure there’s nothing you’re paying for which you shouldn’t be. You’ll be surprised at how easy it is to miss some payments coming out of your account, especially if they’re small and you’ve got a lot of them, but it’s so important to make sure you’re aware of every single one.

Go to your mobile banking app and go through the lists of direct debits and standing orders. Look at every payment and ask yourself three questions: do you need it?, can you afford it?, and is it worth it?
Bills are obvious; you must pay them. But do you have a gym membership which you only use a couple of times a month? In which case, it may be worth researching into whether you can buy a day pass or pay for gym classes as you go – this could work out much cheaper if you don’t go very often.

Subscription services is another category to look at. Are you paying for three streaming services that all do the same thing? If so, can you live with just one or two of them?

This task shouldn’t take you very long at all, and you’ll be surprised at how much money you can save.

Check for any recurring payments

Another important thing to check for are any recurring payments – otherwise known as Continuous Payment Authorities (CPAs). They work essentially like a direct debit, but they’re different in the fact that they use the long card number instead of your account number and sort code and the company can take money whenever they think they’re owed.

The reason you need to do this separately is because they won’t appear in the lists of direct debits or standing orders, they will appear on your bank statement as if they’re a debit card payment. Most will be taken on a monthly basis, so just have a look through the last few months of bank statements and see what’s coming out regularly.

You may have purposefully set some of these up, Amazon Prime and Spotify are examples. In which case, apply the same three questions as mentioned in the point above and cancel any that you can live without.
However, you may have set some up by mistake and these are important to get rid of. This may have been a free trial that you forgot to cancel, or some retail websites have in the small print that you will be signed up to a monthly CPA after making your first purchase and you didn’t realise. You do have the right to cancel any CPAs that you no longer wish to pay.

Compare your bills

If you’re not somebody who compares suppliers and just let your bills roll over every year, then this task is a must.

In some cases, the difference between the cheapest and most expensive tariffs for products like gas, electricity, and insurances can be hundreds of pounds a year. So, a quick check through a comparison website could make a big difference to your finances.
This should be done just before each of your current tariffs/policies come to an end, so you don’t end up paying any early exit fees. You’ll normally just have to fill out some personal details and any information required for the specific product, then you’ll be given a list of all the providers where the cheapest one is normally at the top. With most comparison websites, they will do a lot of the work for you when it comes to switching, so you just have to select which product you want and make any relevant payments.

This won’t necessarily have any immediate effects on your finances, but it will definitely benefit you in the long run.

Switch bank accounts

Switching bank accounts sounds like a massive job, but most of the major banks now offer an online 7-day switching service where they do everything for you, so actually it doesn’t take much time at all and it’s definitely worth the effort.

All you have to do is go to a comparison website which lists all of the available current accounts and compare who’s offering the best interest rates, perks, and functions. It’s important to do this every once and a while and especially when you have a change in financial situation, for example, an increase in income or a big change in the amount you have saved.

Once you’ve decided on the best current account for you, simply go to their website and say you’d like to open an account with them and then they’ll do the rest. They’ll swap over all of your regular payments like direct debits and standing orders and the only thing you’ll have to do is give your new account details to your employer.

Remove your card details from websites

Most online retail stores give you the option to save your card details after you’ve purchased something in order to make the payment process faster next time. Whilst it’s convenient that you don’t have to fill out the details manually every time, it can actually make you spend more when all the effort is taken out of the process.

If you struggle with spending too much and you’re a bit of an impulse shopper, take some time to go through the websites where your card details are saved and remove them. Then, next time you come to purchase something from that website, having to get your card and fill out the details will just give you a little extra thinking time as to whether it’s something you really need.
This isn’t something that will dramatically change your financial situation, but it is something that will help towards curbing the spending if that’s something you struggle with.

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Cash ManagementFinance

Why financial planning tools should be at the forefront of every modern wealth management firm

There has been a radical shift in client’s behaviour towards portfolio construction. No longer is there a requirement for costly active portfolios and instead, many would rather opt for passive low-cost investment products. With a range of advisors providing this offering, the market has become fiercely competitive. Wealth & Finance International sits down with InvestCloud’s Chief Growth Officer (CGO) Mark Trousdale, who gives his views on why modern financial planning tools should be at the forefront of every wealth management firm.

What is behind the trend of moving away from active portfolios towards passive investment products?

Both active and passive investment products have had their days in the sun. If you look at large-cap blended funds from 1985 to 2019, active and passive are nearly neck and neck on the number of years in which those portfolios performed better. In bull markets, many passive portfolios are rising, so active portfolios risk missing the wave. In bear markets, contrarian active portfolios sometimes avoid the pitfalls of the broader market. The rising popularity of passive portfolios is not a judgment of performance in a vacuum – it’s a judgment of performance against fees. Active portfolios simply cost more to invest in than passive portfolios; and given that active portfolios have not consistently outperformed passive ones, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to justify those higher fees.

 

Why is financial planning now more important to financial advisors (and clients)?

Fund fees are not the only ones under the microscope. Transaction fees have fallen significantly, and in some cases to zero – such as Charles Schwab’s move to eliminate fees in October 2019. Advisory fees are also under threat. The market has been taking a critical look at value for money in all areas of financial services. The lower the value of a service – or the more commoditised it is – the harder it is to justify high fees. One area that cannot be commoditised is financial planning, and investors really rate it. After all, what is the point of wealth management if not to ensure financial wellness and help families achieve their goals? Advisers are increasingly emphasising their financial planning offerings to stay at the forefront of investor value creation.

 

How is fee compression affecting firms? Will it get better or worse? How does this affect competitive dynamics in the market?

As noted above, fee compression is having a big impact on several areas of financial services, and it’s only going to get more intense for traditional offerings. But as we’re seeing with financial planning, service innovation and value focus are keys to success. I’m a big believer that price is only an issue in the absence of value. The imperative must be to innovate, focusing on value as the north star. This will spur further competitive dynamics in our market.

 

What do wealth managers and financial advisers need to do with regards to their business models and operations to support this?

In order to innovate and focus on value, advisers should focus on enhanced client communication. This involves empowering clients to interact with their advisers, view account information, track their private assets and held-away accounts, store life’s important documents, consume curated content, build goals and make confident decisions alongside their advisers. At the same time, advisers and other wealth managers need to focus on building in automation to improve operational efficiency. Across the middle and back office, advisers can automate account opening, simplified account funding, scalable model creation and distribution, automated rebalancing, personal balance sheet aggregation, one-click proposal creation and other digital advice apps. This list goes on. The aim is to reduce the number of manual, repetitive and laborious tasks so advisers can instead focus entirely on value creation.


From a technology perspective, what do firms need to implement? Should they build or buy?

Many firms focus on answering the build versus buy question. For advisers and wealth managers, delivering technology effectively is rarely a core competency. That’s not to say that these firms don’t have great tech talent – many do. But their track records are atrocious when it comes to delivering technology solutions on time or on budget. Most in-house technology projects ultimately fail for this reason. Besides considering explicit (vendor) vs. sunk (internal team) costs, firms should also look at risk costs – ‘can do’ is not the same as ‘have done’, and failing clients in this market is not an option. The value proposition to build simply doesn’t exist.

At the same time, buying technology off the shelf can seem like it will save money, but most financial technology is monolithic and cannot be customised at scale.  Logo-swapping is not customisation and clients will notice the lack of flexibility or functionality open to them.

By themselves, build and buy both lead to unsatisfactory results. Advisers and wealth managers should not approach this as one or the other and instead focus on how to take control of technology in a cost-effective, fast-to-deliver way.

The answer to this is via subscriptions to digital platforms that are flexible and modular – build and buy. With a truly modular platform, you can add functionality as your business evolves, versus an all-or-nothing proposition. This also controls recurring costs, because you pay for only what you need. The best type of platform is one that also supports mass customisation – a framework to flexibly configure and customise the look and feel as well as the workflow, integration points and data scope. From a risk and cost perspective, this should be able to be delivered in no more than six months at a price that beats your internal measures. These are all the benefits of a build and buy – the best of both, with none of the downsides.


Should wealth managers/financial advisors look to patch process with different technologies, or should they be focused on digital transformation?

Whether it’s the right answer to complement or replace existing processes and technologies depends on the process and technology in question. A firm should not throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, they should leverage existing investments if they are of value. But equally, firms have loads of technical debt, and can spend a significant portion of their budgets servicing bad tech. So, it’s about reviewing the technical tapestry critically and being strategic about enhancements. This is where hyper-modular apps and functions come into their own, as it means firms use only what they need, complementing their valued investments.


What other considerations do wealth managers and financial advisers need to take into account, e.g. from a digital/engagement perspective?

Investors simply expect more for their money these days, and the norms of consumer digital offerings have crept into many of their psyches. Wealth managers and financial advisers need to be extremely forward-thinking about how they automate workflows, and how they communicate with and manage their clients. Not only is a website no longer anywhere near enough, but also a basic client portal is no longer enough. Advisers and wealth managers should focus on truly enhancing client communication through things like enabling multi-channel adviser interactions and dynamic, holistic digital advice financial planning. These are the things that will matter most to them.


What other trends will affect how wealth managers and financial advisers conduct their business in 2020?

Wealth managers and advisers can expect further fee compression as well as even greater investor emphasis on financial planning. Depending on the demographic, ESG is coming much more into the mainstream. So, expect investors to be demanding more intuitive and engaging tools to compare financial products at a glance in order to help them achieve their goals. It would also not be surprising to see firms outside the US start to offer Turnkey Asset Management Programs (TAMPs) or TAMP-like platforms, which may fundamentally alter how wealth managers and advisers deliver services.

Mark Trousdale, EVP, serves as InvestCloud's Chief Growth Officer (CGO)

Mark Trousdale, EVP, serves as InvestCloud’s Chief Growth Officer (CGO). In this role, Mark is responsible for growing InvestCloud’s adoption and revenue in a consistent fashion, currently focused on the UK and broader EMEA, and headquartered in London. Mark’s responsibilities include business development, regional P&L and executive committee participation. As part of InvestCloud’s founding team, Mark has served in a number of different roles at InvestCloud throughout the years, building upon nearly 20 years of experience in financial and professional services. Prior to joining InvestCloud, Mark led the western region Asset Management Advisory practice of Deloitte. Mark holds a BA with Honors and an MA with Distinction from Stanford University.

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ArticlesBankingCash Management

Cold Shoulder From Banks As Hiring Freeze Puts Pressure On Cashflow For Recruitment Firms

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Cold Shoulder From Banks As Hiring Freeze Puts Pressure On Cashflow For Recruitment Firms

The Association of Professional Staffing Companies called for a more responsible approach from the banking sector as a survey of its membership painted a picture of demands for personal guarantees, offers of alternative loans to the Government backed Business Interruption Loan (CBIL) and inflated interest rates.

The survey, which questioned 120 recruitment firms found that over a third of businesses who felt that the CBIL could benefit their business either do not know how to access it; find the criteria prohibitive or the process too complicated and difficult.

“Banks are asking for personal guarantees from business owners as there also seems to be a tendency to try and sell you anything but the Government scheme” said one APSCo member while another said: “The terms appear to be arbitrary rather than qualified by the Chancellor. One bank is charging 12% with a threat to seize homes if repayment terms are not met.”

The survey also revealed that hiring is at a near standstill with 22% of recruitment firms reporting that permanent hiring is at zero and almost half (47%) reporting a decrease in hiring activity of 90%.

Two thirds of recruitment firms have had up to 25% of their contractors terminated in the last week; 15% have had up to 50% terminated and 17% have had up to 100% terminated.

Commenting on the results Ann Swain, Chief Executive of APSCo said:

“The banks have to be made to take a responsible approach so that firms can get access to the cash they need as the Chancellor intended. We are, along with the Recruitment and Employment Confederation, writing a joint letter to Government asking them to urgently review the banks approach so that this lifeline can be made available as soon as possible. The collapse in hiring activity has hit recruitment firms very hard not least because the furlough scheme does not cover those who have been made a job offer but who have not started. 

“This of course is understandable and we appreciate why the Government could not stretch its already generous package further. This does mean though that there will be many recruitment firms unable to invoice for work that they have already done which makes it even more important that they are able to rely on the banks to do the right thing.”

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Cash ManagementWealth Management

Sweden Set For Dramatic Growth In Digital Wealth Management

Sweden

Sweden Set For Dramatic Growth In Digital Wealth Management

Nucoro, the London based fintech company providing bespoke investment and savings technology focused on delivering digital investment solutions to third parties, believes Sweden is set to see huge growth in its digital wealth management sector.

It believes there are three key factors driving this – a rapidly growing population of mass affluent and high net worth individuals; the fact that a significant percentage of Sweden’s workforce are employed in the technology and the telecommunications sectors, and the country’s huge and growing focus on fintech.

Growing population of mass affluent and high net worth individuals

Analysis of industry data by Nucoro reveals that 7% of people in work in Sweden earn over $90,000 a year or 906,000 Swedish Krona (SEK).(1) It’s analysis also reveals a growing pool of wealthy people in Sweden, many of whom Nucoro believes are increasingly open to using digital wealth management services.(2) There were around 200,500 millionaires in Sweden in 2018, and this is set to rise to 245,000 (an increase of 22%) by 2023. In terms of those Swedes worth $30 million or more, there were around 3,820 with this level of wealth in 2018, and this is expected to rise to 4,700 – an increase of some 25% – by 2023.

 

HNWs and the technology and telecommunications sector

Nucoro’s analysis of industry data reveals that around 16% of Sweden’s wealth is derived from the technology and telecommunications sectors.(3) This is one of the highest percentages of any country, and it means that many Swedes are comfortable using digital wealth management services. 

 

Strong focus on fintech

Sweden was one of the earliest adopters of technology in financial services, and this is reflected in its fintech sector, which attracted a record investment last year. Sweden’s fintech sector saw investment of €778 million in 2019, the seventh largest amount of any country in the world, and in Europe only the UK and Germany received more.(4)

Stockholm has one of the most thriving fintech scenes in Europe. It has 114 banks and nearly 400 fintech companies. Some 18% of the Swedish capital’s citizens are employed in the tech sector, and the most common job in Stockholm is a programmer. (5)

Nikolai Hack, COO Nucoro said: “Sweden is an incredibly attractive market for the digital wealth management sector. Over the next few years, we expect to see a rapidly increasing number of services in this area being launched to cater for a growing pool of people who are comfortable using digital platforms to manage their investments and wealth.

“We are keen to work with both traditional and non-traditional financial services companies in Sweden to help them develop propositions in this area.”

From client onboarding to portfolio construction through to billing, Nucoro combines all the tools required to build the next generation of savings and investment propositions. To help financial services companies move forward, Nucoro offers a new technology-based foundation built without legacies – a complete overhaul to the models of client service and accessibility. It offers a radically different approach to the relationship between technology providers and the organisations adopting their solutions.

Nucoro offers a fully automated, AI-powered wealth management platform to UK retail investors called Exo Investing.  Within the first year of operation, Exo won two industry awards (Best digital wealth manager OTY + Industry Innovator OTY at the AltFi awards 2018), was named as a finalist in three more and selected to two disruptive company annual indexes (Wealthtech 100 and Disruption50’s 100 most disruptive UK companies).

Nucoro is making this technology available for financial services companies based in Sweden that have the ambition to truly innovate and future-proof their businesses – and are struggling to realise their digital ambitions.

(1) https://www.averagesalarysurvey.com/sweden
(2) Nucoro analysis of Knight Frank Wealth Report 2019
(3) Global Data: ‘Wealth in Sweden: HNW Investors 2018’
(4) Innovate Finance: January 2020
(5) Invest Stockholm: Stockholm Fintech Guide

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ArticlesCash Management

Low Interest Rates and Inflation Are Wiping Out The Nation’s Savings

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Low Interest Rates and Inflation Are Wiping Out The Nation’s Savings

The latest research by the peer to peer lending platform, Sourced Capital of the Sourced.co Group, has revealed how high inflation rates and below-par interest rates on savings accounts are making it tough for the nation’s savers.

Sourced Capital looked at the annual rate of inflation seen since 2012 on an annual basis and compared this yearly change in the cost of living to the interest secured on an annual basis via the average savings account rate and a one year, fixed-rate ISA, to see how if saving is really worth the time and investment anymore.

Inflation effectively shrinks the value of your money over time and according to the Consumer Price Index, which tracks the cost of household items, the value of £1,000 on the high street at the start of 2012, would now have climbed to £1,153 today.

But what about your savings? Had you invested that £1,000 in the average savings account with your bank or building society back in 2012, your money today would have climbed to just £1,048.

Opting for the average cash ISA with an annual fixed rate would have seen your £1,000 investment reach £1,126 today.

As a result, the interest earned on these savings options would have been wiped out due to the increasing cost of inflation.

In fact, since 2012 inflation has increased at a greater rate than the return available from the average savings account each year, with an ISA proving a better option in just two of the eight years (2015 and 2016).

With traditional routes to saving no longer providing a sufficient return, many armchair investors have turned to Innovative Finance ISAs, which while pose the same capital at risk as other investment platforms, provide much greater returns of up to 10%.

Looking at the last three years alone since they have grown in popularity, the value of £1,000 on the high street according to the CPI would now have climbed to £1,067 today. Again, a traditional savings account would have returned just £1,008, while a fixed rate ISA is slightly better but still offers a loss compared to inflation at £1,037.

An IFISA however, would have returned £1,331, £264 higher than the loss due to the rate of inflation over that time.

Period

Average Inflation rate (CPIH)

Example amount – relative value/cost

Average Instant Access savings rate

Example amount – savings

Average Fixed Rate ISA 1 year

Example amount – savings

start

£1,000

£1,000

£1,000

2012

2.6%

£1,026

1.45%

£1,015

2.54%

£1,025

2013

2.3%

£1,050

0.86%

£1,023

1.77%

£1,044

2014

1.5%

£1,065

0.67%

£1,030

1.49%

£1,059

2015

0.4%

£1,070

0.54%

£1,036

1.41%

£1,074

2016

1.0%

£1,080

0.35%

£1,039

1.07%

£1,086

2017

2.6%

£1,108

0.15%

£1,041

1.05%

£1,097

2018

2.3%

£1,134

0.23%

£1,043

1.31%

£1,111

2019

1.7%

£1,153

0.42%

£1,048

1.30%

£1,126

Founder and Managing Director of Sourced Capital, Stephen Moss, commented:

“It’s been a tough ask to get any form return on your savings in recent years and this has been largely down to interest rates remaining so low in an attempt to stimulate the economy through consumer spending.

Of course, the flip side to this is that inflation has remained fairly robust and has sat between 1.5% and 2.6% in all but two of the last eight years. As a result, not only has the return on our savings been minimal, but the increasing cost of living has pretty much wiped out any return available.

It’s no surprise that as a result, alternative methods of investing have come to the forefront and the likes of the Innovation Finance ISA have grown in popularity with armchair investors and investment professionals alike. While there is, of course, an element of risk, investing in peer to peer products particularly in the property sector has seen consistently higher returns over the last few years, despite quieter market conditions due to Brexit uncertainty.”

housing ladder
Cash ManagementTransactional and Investment Banking

An IF-ISA Can Get You Onto The Housing Ladder 7 Years Faster Than A Cash ISA

housing ladder

An IF-ISA Can Get You Onto The Housing Ladder 7 Years Faster Than A Cash ISA

The latest research by leading peer to peer lending platform Sourced Capital, part of the Sourced.co Group, has looked at how best to invest when it comes to saving for a house in order to save years’ worth of painstaking saving.

Cash ISAs have become a popular way for many to stash away the cash with the aim of climbing the ladder, with the Help to Buy ISA in particular helping many save that all important deposit.  

While buyers can no longer take advantage of the scheme there are a whole host of Cash ISA saving accounts that average a return of 2.12% a year with a maximum annual investment of £20,000 allowed.  

This means that investing £20,000 a year on the current average UK house price of £235,298, and when taking into account the addition of compound interest, maximising the benefits of a Cash ISA would see you pay off the cost of a property in 10 years compared to the 11.8 years it would require to save £20,000 a year with no benefit from interest.  

With the lower cost of buying in Northern Ireland and Scotland, it would take 6 and 7 years respectively, instead of 7 and 7.7 years saving £20,000 a year straight up, and in the North East a Cash ISA can also cut your saving time to 6 years instead of 6.5. 

In London, you’re looking at a longer saving stretch of 19 years although this is marginally better than saving for 23.8 years without the help of an ISA.

However, investing in an Innovative Finance ISA (IFISA) through a peer to peer platform such as Sourced Capital could help you pay off your property much faster, with annual returns hitting 10% and higher.

With backing from the UK government, showing their confidence in the sector, there is now encouragement to invest in property through peer to peer lending. The IFISA is a category of ISA which was launched in April 2016 for UK taxpayers. Previously, there have been two main types of ISA: Cash ISAs and Stocks and Shares ISAs. Similar to these ISAs, the IFISA allows you to invest money without paying personal income tax. This enables you to invest your money into the growing peer to peer market. 

Like cash ISAs Each tax year, you get an allowance of up to £20,000 to put into IFISAs which you can distribute across your different ISAs should you wish to. In addition, you can transfer your previous year’s ISA investments into your IFISA.

While this investment option allows for a much quicker return across the board, nearly 3 years faster in the UK as a whole, the time saving is most notable in London where an IFISA investment could accrue a big enough saving pot to buy in the capital at a cost of £475,458 in just 12 year’s, as opposed to 19 year’s via the average Cash ISA – a seven year difference! 

Stephen Moss, founder and MD of Sourced Capital, commented: 

“Record low interest rates over such a prolonged period have been great for those looking to secure a mortgage, however, those still trying to accumulate a savings pot have suffered where the rate of interest is concerned.

As a result, the consumer has become savvy when it comes to saving and the market has been flooded with a whole host of options to make our money work harder. While some Cash ISAs are proving popular, the peer to peer sector has really led the way with some of the best rates of return and whether you are trying to save a mortgage deposit, or pay off your property completely, there are a number of platforms like Sourced who can help you reach your goal far quicker than some of the more mainstream options.  

As always, the biggest hurdle is educating the consumer on the additional options open to them and although their capital may be at risk, investing via more professional platforms in the peer to peer sector can bring a much better return.”

Sale Credit
ArticlesCash Management

Point Of Sale Credit: Latest Trap For Consumers

Sale Credit

Point Of Sale Credit: Latest Trap For Consumers

Applying for credit at the till or checkout is becoming more and more common. Klarna, one of the biggest ‘Buy Now Pay Later’ credit companies promote their product as a way to improve customer’s spending power, both in store and online. The concept is, rather than saving and waiting to pay for an item, you can seamlessly apply for credit at the checkout. This sounds extremely convenient for consumers who need to purchase a crucial item and otherwise might have had to rely on payday loans or emergency funding. The risk, however, is frivolous purchases and over-buying. 70% of consumers asked in a recent survey said they had used a Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) scheme. 73% of those who admitted to using BNPL said it led to debt problems later down the line.

 

Increase Basket Sizes

Clearpay, another major competitor in the UK BNPL market, published that offering financing options at the check out increased online basket size by 20 – 30%. This data fuels Klarna’s statement that these payment plans increase customers spending power, but it does not take budgets into account. Although, assumedly, this does mean that customers get 20 – 30% more goods, they also have an increased bill. BNPL schemes distance the consumer from their payment, as money is not taken immediately from their bank account. This suggests that consumers that add to their basket when they find out they can spread the cost, might not take the time to think about the affordability aspect.

For retailers, offering Klarna or BNPL options at the checkout could be beneficial. Of course, these systems are most popular online, but in-store consumer credit is becoming more accessible. This is said to motivate sales again, which translates to a higher spend for customers.

 

Turning Browsers Into Buyers

BNPL credit continues to develop because it helps to bridge the gap between online convenience and real-life experiences. Consumer trends in 2020 highlight that customer experience is how companies will add value to their physical stores. It is suggested that Klarna, Clearpay and other schemes allow you to enjoy shopping online in your spare time, whenever that might be, and then take your ‘fun’ browsing one step further.

One of the biggest obstacles for online shopping is the returns process. Especially, for retailers targeting younger demographics who might need their returns credited sooner rather than later in order to manage other bills or outgoings. BNPL is the solution. If you return goods before the first payment, no money will leave your account. Yet this does depend on keeping track of returns and payment dates. It also runs the risk of fun, hobby browsing turning into an expensive, out of control habit.

 

An At-Risk Audience

The younger generation are known for their “on-demand” lifestyle. BNPL could be seen to feed this desire, because it means you do not need the money available to pay for new items. BNPL credit companies have identified the younger, Gen Z or millennial demographics as their target audience. This is evidenced by the stores they choose to partner with, most of which are apparel brands with an audience of 16 – 30 year olds. 

In the UK, the Financial Conduct Authority are the financial industry’s watchdog. After the sharp rise of BNPL credit companies, it’s not surprising that they promised stricter regulations. These were introduced in November 2019 and were estimated to save the consumer around £40 – £60 million per year. Klarna’s marketing tactics were also called into question, as it dissolved the responsibility and association with a purchase. Although there might be immediate financial benefits for companies that use BNPL, there might be a moral or ethical issue in the future that could deter sales. Interestingly, the CEO of Next, the clothing and homeware retailer, described the service as dangerous, stating, “there is a difference between spreading of the cost and just deferring it”.

bank of england
BankingCash Management

Traditional UK Banks Are Failing To Engage With Users

bank of england

Traditional UK Banks Are Failing To Engage With Users

One in five UK bank customers happy to see branches close in favour of improved digital experiences.

Boomi™, a Dell Technologies business, announced the results of its research on banks’ engagement with their customers. The research finds almost one in three (30%) UK adults consider the search for a better customer experience in digital interactions the main driver for changing banks.

The research quizzed 6,000 adults across the UK and Europe on the customer experience provided by their bank, and how the bank meets their needs.

Currently, nearly one in five (17%) UK customers believe their traditional bank feels ‘a bit old’ and they are looking for an improved digital performance. A fifth (22%) would even be happy if their bank closed its branches if it resulted in an improved mobile app / online banking experience. This figure rises to over a third (39%) among those aged 18-24, who also prioritise having a good banking app (58%).

The results showed traditional UK banks are not engaging with customers like they used to, and are failing to adapt and mitigate this, showing a deep disconnect between modes of communication chosen by banks (email 39%, mobile app 24%), versus those preferred by customers (phone 71%, email 69%, mobile app 62%). Most customers remain with their banking provider just through force of habit (39%), despite citing a good online banking experience (37%) and a good mobile banking experience (35%) as paramount.

The most dissatisfied customers are in the UK

On average, other European countries such as the Netherlands (33%) and Sweden (33%) are happier with their digital banking experience than UK customers (24%). The survey also found that EU banking customers (72%) don’t change banks, but add additional banks, with one in five holding a digital bank account with challenger banks like Monzo, Starling or Revolut as well as their ‘traditional’ bank account.

As of January 13th 2018, Open Banking has required banks to increase transparency and open APIs to enable third-party developers’ access to their account holder data and services. Just 21% of respondents, however, report their current bank offers open banking services, while 66% are not sure if it does – indicating a requirement for further education on the topic.

“New account holders won’t hold the same loyalty to their bank as previous generations have. New players entering the market have challenged the industry status quo thereby setting a new standard around the digital banking experience, forever changing customers’ expectations. Customers are looking for more than better products when choosing their next provider,” said Derek Thompson, VP of EMEA at Boomi.

“It’s therefore critical that banks assess their current IT ecosystem, ensuring they’re not held back by their legacy infrastructure and can quickly unite their digital ecosystems, deploying more agile technology to transform customer experience,” he added.

When asked why they bank with their current provider, a good all-round customer experience (44%) was the main reason cited by respondents, followed by having “always been with them” (39%) and “enjoying a good online banking experience” (37%).

offshore
BankingCash ManagementOffshore

5 Reasons Why You Need To Bank Offshore

offshore

5 Reasons Why You Need To Bank Offshore

Offshore banking is often associated with negative connotations in regard to tax evasion and criminal activity, but this couldn’t be further than the truth. Despite what you may hear, offshore banking is completely legal. Put simply, they’re bank accounts held in a country other than the one you permanently reside in.

So why do you need one? James Turner, Director at York-based Turner Little, takes us through the benefits of banking offshore.

They’re not just for the ultra-wealthy

A common misconception is that offshore banks are just for ultra-high net worth individuals, who want to hide their money. Anyone can benefit from using an offshore bank account, depending on what their needs are. At Turner Little, we work with our clients to specifically identify their needs, and tailor our solutions based on our extensive experience and understanding of the banking industry.

They’re safe

Offshore banks are often considered to be politically and economically stable, with any associated risk considerably reduced. Using an offshore bank, based in a highly regulated, transparent jurisdiction that offers individuals an element of protection with a deposit compensation scheme, enables you to feel safe in the understanding that your wealth will be protected from the risks of capital accessibility restrictions, control and potential currency devaluation.

 
They provide flexibility and control

Banking offshore is completely flexible, often offering the same high level of service you would expect with traditional, onshore banking. It has always been a successful way of ensuring you maintain control over your long-term finances, which ultimately means you have greater freedom without depending on any one country. This convenience and flexibility is especially relevant for those who travel regularly, or have international assets.

You’ll always have easy access

Offshore banks have evolved over the last decade, and offer 24/7 online banking. This means that no matter where you are, you’ll always have easy access to your funds. Depending on which bank you choose, you’ll also have access to accounts in multiple currencies, allowing you to manage accounts and automate payments whenever you need.

You’ll be able to build on your investment portfolio

Many countries offer tax incentives for foreign investments and provide you with a wide choice of both funds and investments. There is no shortage of opportunities that are fiscally sound, designed to promote a healthy investment environment and, most importantly, legal.

insurance cost
Cash ManagementInsurance

Five Ways To Save Money On Fuel This Christmas

insurance cost

Five Ways To Save Money On Fuel This Christmas

As all motorists will know, fuel prices are one of the many hidden costs of owning a car, and with fuel prices set to reach a six-year high, now is the perfect time for motorists to start thinking about how to get the most out of their tank.

To help motorists cut costs over the festive period, the UK’s leading car parts provider, Euro Car Parts has shared their top five ways to save fuel by driving more efficiently.

 

  1. Drive at one speed through speed bumps

Some driving styles can mean extra fuel is used when driving over speed bumps, and learning how to properly tackle them could save motorists a lot of money. 

Motorists can avoid any unnecessary fuel consumption by driving at a constant speed between bumps. Accelerating or braking too often in between speed bumps is when most fuel is used. 

 

  1. Don’t overfill your tank

It might be common knowledge that carrying excess weight reduces fuel efficiency, but did you know that overfilling your tank can actually make your car less efficient?

Although it seems counter-intuitive, brimming your tank will lead to extra fuel being used to transport the extra weight, and by only filling it up to half full you can cut extra weight and save money in the process. 

 

  1. Managing your revs

Most drivers barely look at the RPM (revolutions per minute) count when changing gear and rely on the sound or ‘feel’ of the engine. However, in doing so, you could be over-revving without even knowing, and wasting precious fuel with each gear change.

The most fuel-efficient RPM to change up a gear is 2,500 for a petrol car and 2,000 for diesel. So next time you’re changing gear keep an eye on the revs count, stick to that number and the pennies you’ll save will soon stack up.

Additionally, try to avoid dropping your revs too low, as this could cause unnecessary strain on the engine and waste fuel. Staying above 1,500 revs in petrol and 1,300 in diesel cars should comfortably avoid this.

 

  1. Slow down on high-speed roads

Driving at high speeds down dual carriageways and motorways means your engine is operating at a higher RPM than it is on slower roads. 

However, by simply slowing down a little on those fast roads you could end up saving a lot of money. The most efficient speed to drive at is between 55-65mph, and driving at 70mph compared to 80mph could save you 25% more fuel.

 

  1. Turn your engine off

It might seem obvious, but it’s worth remembering that keeping your engine idle whilst stationary and not using your car still burns fuel.

Leaving your car running on a cold winter’s morning, or keeping the engine on whilst sat in stationary traffic, wastes a lot of unnecessary fuel. If you know you’re going to be stationary for some time, it’s a good idea to turn off the engine to conserve your petrol or diesel.

Chris Barella, Digital Services Director at Euro Car Parts, said: “Driving more economically can save a lot more money than drivers may realise. By following these tips not only are you kinder on your wallet, but you’re also helping to cut down on unnecessary emissions”.

For more information on driving efficiently and saving fuel visit during the winter months visit: https://www.eurocarparts.com/blog/top-5-winter-driving-tips

boring money
BankingCash ManagementTransactional and Investment Banking

New Charges Calculator Tackles ‘Shocking’ Lack of Clarity in the Investment Industry

boring money

New Charges Calculator Tackles ‘Shocking’ Lack of Clarity in the Investment Industry

Consumer investment site BoringMoney.co.uk has launched an independent fee calculator which provides investors with a single simple £ fee across 20 leading platforms and robo advisors.

According to research from the company’s 2019 Online Investing Report, two thirds of investors are not fully confident they understand what fees they are currently paying. Additional Boring Money testing shows that even those who feel confident often miscalculate in reality, as a result of complex fee structures and ambiguous additional charges.

Holly Mackay, CEO of Boring Money commented: “Trying to work out what we pay for investment services remains shockingly difficult. Customers tell us they want to see a single £ fee, but instead they have to build complex Excel spreadsheets with multiple inputs to try and work out what each provider costs.”

The Investment Fee Calculator – found at www.boringmoney.co.uk/calculator – enables investors and would-be investors to compare fees across 20 leading investment providers. In an industry first, the calculator also pulls in both customer ratings and the Boring Money rating so that customers can choose whether to focus on price alone, or take a broader view of the service.

Although designed to be simple to use – with pre-programmed assumptions for those who don’t know how many trades a year they make, or how exactly their investments are split between funds and shares – more experienced investors can override these assumptions to tailor the calculations more accurately.

Alongside the unveiling of the calculator, Boring Money is also launching a campaign for fairer fee disclosure.

Mackay says: “There’s endless talk and very little action. We know that customers want to see fees in simple £ amounts. We know they want to be able to compare.

“We are calling on the industry to improve this fundamental part of disclosure and acknowledge that transparency is not the same as clarity. We think every part of the chain – from platform to asset manager – should have some way for consumers to understand in simple £ terms what any given investment would cost. So they can make informed and confident decisions.” 

The campaign comes against the backdrop of the FCA’s recent Investment Platforms Market Study, in which the regulator very clearly stated that it expects the industry to show “progress in making charges more accessible and comparable for consumers who are shopping around”.

Major players in the industry have shown support for Boring Money’s cause.

Andy Bell, Chief Executive of AJ Bell Youinvest commented: “Seeing an investment platform’s charges in pounds and pence is significantly easier for people to understand than percentages. It’s something we’ve provided on our website for a while now and the Boring Money calculator is a good addition to research tools available to investors.”

Highlighting the importance of understanding fees, he added: “Price isn’t everything of course and people will also want to look at service and the reputation of the platform provider, but making sure you have the best value platform for your needs can save thousands of pounds over a long term investment.”

telecoms
Cash ManagementFundsMarketsTax

UK Telecoms Industry Boasts Fastest Growing R&D Spend Of Any Sector

telecoms

UK Telecoms Industry Boasts Fastest Growing R&D Spend Of Any Sector

The telecoms industry is the UK’s fastest growing sector when it comes to spending on R&D, the latest ONS data has revealed.
Telecoms businesses increased their spending on research and development by £192m to £947m, according to the latest statistics for 2018 which were released recently.

This was a rise of 25.4%, taking it to a four-year high. However, the sector is still some way off its all-time high of £1.5bn set in 2007, analysis by R&D tax relief specialist Catax shows.

Total R&D spending by telecoms firms totalled £755m in 2017 and £797m in 2016.

The amount that UK businesses across all sectors have invested in R&D continues to grow, rising £1.4bn to £25bn in 2018 — up 5.8%. Manufacturing was associated with £16.3bn of R&D spending, up 4.7%, but pharmaceuticals remained the biggest product group with £4.5bn of R&D spending, up 3.3%.

The number of staff employed by UK businesses also continued to grow, rising 7.3% annually to exceed 250,000 full-time equivalents for the first time.

Mark Tighe, chief executive of R&D tax relief specialists Catax, said: “The telecoms industry is extremely important to the UK strategically and it is reassuring to see such growth in investment.

“There is still some way to go if this investment is to recover to levels seen before the financial crash, however, and it is vital this happens if Britain is to continue to be a key technological player on the world stage.

“More broadly, this is the second full year that Brexit Britain has shrugged off the political poison after the EU referendum and posted great gains in terms of R&D investment, running head and shoulders above the long-term average.

“For the first time in history a quarter of a million people nationwide are engaged full time in keeping the UK at the cutting edge. This is going to make a huge difference to Britain’s prospects outside the EU.

“The rate at which UK businesses are adding R&D staff to the workforce remains impressive, virtually matching the previous year with a rise of 7.3%.”

Online banking
BankingCash ManagementPrivate BankingWealth Management

For UK Consumers the Front Door of a Bank is Now Its Mobile App, Not Its Physical Branch

Online banking

For UK Consumers the Front Door of a Bank is Now Its Mobile App, Not Its Physical Branch

 

72 percent of UK residents said they do the majority of their banking online and 77 percent consider switching to digital-only providers.

Marqeta, the first global modern card issuing platform, announced the results today of its new digital banking survey, which found that demand for physical bank branches continues to decline as digital banking platforms offer more seamless access to remote money management tools.

The research, conducted by Propeller Insights on behalf of Marqeta and surveying 800 UK and 1200 US consumers, found that 74 percent of consumers expect to use their mobile app regularly in the next three months, in comparison with just 22 percent who expect to visit a physical branch. The majority of respondents (77 percent) said that they will consider digital-only platforms when they next switch banks.

Most UK consumers (72 percent) also confirmed that they now complete almost all of their banking online, with the younger generation leading the way. Almost two-thirds (65 percent) of UK respondents aged 18-34 say they use a digital bank as either a primary or secondary banking option. Of those that use a digital bank in tandem with a traditional option, 56 percent of them said that they were more satisfied with the service provided by their digital bank. 

Trends in digital banking have also seen UK consumers make the switch to digital faster than their US counterparts. The survey found that:

• Only 21 percent of UK respondents, expect to visit a physical bank branch in the next three months, compared to 30 percent of US respondents.

• 72 percent of UK respondents said they do the majority of their banking online, while 62 percent of US respondents said the same. 

This confidence in utilising digital banking platforms is driving new expectations for innovation in the banking and fintech sector, as the vast majority of UK respondents (86 percent) say they want to see new technology from their bank in the future.

Marqeta’s survey also show that given how new digital banks are, consumers see the risk factor around digital banking as somewhat of an unknown. 51 percent of UK consumers said they felt like a digital bank was a riskier place to store their money, while 41 percent said they would limit how much money they deposited in a digital bank. 78 percent of UK respondents said they considered a bank’s security and reputation before giving them their business, with 30 percent saying that a lack of market track record was holding them back from making the move to a digital-only bank.

“This research demonstrates that UK consumers are ready to go digital with their finances, but digital banks still must work hard to innovate as we become an increasingly cashless, mobile-first society,” said Ian Johnson, Head of Europe at Marqeta. “Apps and payments cards account for an overwhelming majority of spending and money-management actions, and the rapid rise of new wave challenger banks is a major drive of this of this. At Marqeta we see the modern card issuing market being worth as much as $80 trillion globally by 2030, which is going to continue to create unprecedented demand for innovation and new offerings in banking.”

Wealth and Finance
Cash ManagementPensionsPrivate BankingReal EstateWealth Management

The Mosaic of Modern Wealth: Wealth Advisers Must Keep Pace with Globally Mobile Clients

Wealth and Finance

The Mosaic of Modern Wealth: Wealth Advisers Must Keep Pace with Globally Mobile Clients

 

By Axel Hörger, CEO Europe at Lombard International Assurance

The world’s wealthiest people are on the move. According to this year’s Knight Frank Wealth Report, 26% of ultra-high-net-worth individuals (UHNWIs) are planning on emigrating in the next year. An astounding 36% already hold a second passport. For many, the ability to move their lives, families and assets freely around the world is the new norm.

This trend has been growing for well over a decade, fuelled by increased competition between countries seeking to attract the world’s wealthiest and drive investment. From France to Thailand, countries are seeing the benefit of adopting competitive tax regimes, investment-based visa schemes, and fast-tracked citizenship programmes. Since 2000, 20 EU member states have implemented these types of policies, resulting in approximately $28 billion in foreign direct investment.

For countries like Malta and Cyprus, this has led to a much-needed economic boost as thousands of wealthy individuals have invested in their local economies in return for residency or citizenship. In Portugal, attractive tax rates have in part led to a remarkable economic rebound, with GDP growth set to be one of the highest in Europe, while Lisbon and Porto consistently top the list of most attractive places to live in the world. As countries look to replicate this type of success story, global mobility is only set to increase.

But as global mobility increases so too does the complexity of managing wealth. Globally mobile clients will look to their advisers to be able to seamlessly manage their cross-border wealth, regardless of where they look to base themselves. And as many of the residency by investment programmes have a time limit, moving to a third or fourth country over a ten-year period is becoming increasingly normal. Wealth solutions for truly globally mobile clients need to be able to facilitate this unprecedented level of cross-border movement.

Advisers will also have to be aware that the globally mobile HNW and UHNW client base they are serving is expanding. In 2018, $8.7 trillion of personal financial wealth was held cross-borders – roughly 4.2% of the global total. The fabric of modern-day wealth is evolving as the sources and destinations of this wealth are set to change significantly over the coming years. For example, Boston Consulting Group predicts that by 2023, the value of Asia’s cross-border wealth will have grown by 150%.

Wealth advisers will need to keep pace with this dramatic shift and cater for the changing needs of this growing client base. Driven by continuing economic and political uncertainty in the region, HNWIs and UHNWIs from emerging markets will increasingly seek asset safety, protecting against currency depreciation, and the desire to gain stable returns through international diversification. What these clients need are wealth structuring solutions that can manage cross border wealth spread across multiple developed markets. They will also need advisers who are able to navigate effectively around any regulatory or cultural differences between markets.

The mosaic that makes up the lives of modern wealthy people is constantly shifting and being redesigned as wealth is distributed across a more diverse range of ages, genders and nationalities than ever before. What drives wealthy people around the world has never been so complex. For wealth advisers, this means greater difficulties and greater opportunities. The wealth management industry needs to understand the changing landscape that faces HNWIs and UHNWIs and offer solutions that can help them to navigate the uncertainty and complexity.

When I speak to clients, what they are looking for is comfort that their adviser has expertise across multiple markets and jurisdictions. What they want is a feeling of control over their wealth and life’s legacy wherever they are, wherever they want to be, and regardless of what lies ahead.

For more information about Lombard International Assurance, visit our website.

Retirement fund
Cash ManagementPensionsTransactional and Investment Banking

Retirement fund is top saving priority for Brits

Retirement fund

Retirement fund is top saving priority for Brits

 

Over half (58%) of Brits wish they had invested in their future and retirement at an earlier age, according to new research by savings and mortgage provider Nottingham Building Society, known as The Nottingham.

The survey of 2,000 UK adults looked at the biggest saving priorities for the nation, and what age we wish we had started investing in different aspects of our lives, from health and careers to money management. A retirement fund was ranked as the biggest saving priority, despite only 29% of respondents admitting to actively saving towards their future.

The top ten most important saving priorities for Brits are:

  1. Retirement fund

  2. ‘Rainy day’ fund

  3. House deposit or increasing equity

  4. Holiday fund

  5. Funds to partake in my hobbies / outside of work activities

  6. Debt repayments

  7. New car

  8. Children’s saving account

  9. Children’s education

  10. Wedding fund

Debt repayments didn’t make the top five saving priorities for the nation, however, of the respondents who are currently saving, paying off or planning to pay off their debt, this saving was ranked second in importance, indicating that those who are currently in debt are prioritising this over saving for other factors such as a house deposit (ranked fourth in importance), or a new car (ranked seventh).

However, when it comes to what Brits are actually saving for, the most common goal was a ‘rainy day’ fund, with over a third (34%) of Brits currently saving towards this. Interestingly, more than double are saving towards a holiday (29%) than a house deposit (13%), despite a house deposit being ranked as a higher priority overall.

When it comes to the ages the nation wish they had started investing in different aspects of our lives, Brits found that they wished they had invested towards their retirement at age 31, when on average they actually began investing at 39 – almost a decade later. On average, UK adults begin saving towards a ‘rainy day’ fund at 34, despite wishing they had started at 28.

Retirement data

 

Jenna McKenzie-Day, Senior Savings Manager at The Nottingham, said: “Our research found that on average, homeowners wish they had begun planning to buy their first home three years earlier than they started, with a similar picture being painted for those saving for their future. Interestingly, it found that Brits wish they had started their retirement fund a staggering eight years before they actually began saving.

“Whether you are saving for your first home or starting your retirement plans, products such as the LISA, which is available for those looking to plan for their future, offer a 25% government backed bonus on annual savings  up to £4,000, those extra eight years of savings could have increased their future savings by a potential £8,000 – making it the perfect product to start your saving journey.”

To find out more about the Nottingham’s LISA, visit: https://www.thenottingham.com/lifetime-isa/

card
BankingCash Management

Yordex introduces smart company card to spend management solution software, which cuts the cost and complexity of controlling business finances

card

Yordex introduces smart company card to spend management solution software - which cuts the cost and complexity of controlling business finances

 

UK fintech Yordex is making it simple for fast-growing companies to control business spend by adding company cards to its smart spend management solution, giving businesses complete visibility and authority over their current and future finances.

Expense management currently takes up a disproportionate amount of time and money within most organisations; on average, it costs in excess of $20 in people power to process every invoice or expense claim, while expenses only account for less than 6% of total company spend.* In addition, firms struggle to get a real-time picture of their financial health, as their existing software platform only provide a historical view of spend. It takes an average company up to 10 working days at month end to get an accurate account of what was spent the previous month.

Yordex is pioneering a new approach to managing business finances. Its smart solution provides 100% visibility over company spending – from cards and expenses to invoices and budgets – so businesses can control all current and future finances in one place, reducing the cost of spend management by 60-70%.

Adding company cards further enhances Yordex’s smart spend management solution, by empowering employees to make autonomous purchases within set spending limits. Receipts and invoices are automatically matched with expenses and the correct VAT rate is applied, significantly reducing the administrative and compliance burden placed on staff. Businesses can also manage online spending, such as subscriptions, through virtual cards, avoiding the need to unsecurely pass physical cards around the office.

By introducing smart company cards that are fully integrated with Yordex’s spend management platform, businesses will be able to make agile, insight driven decision-making enabling real-time spend visibility and accurate cash flow control through the use of Yordex’s financial reporting tools.

Erik De Kroon, co-founder and CEO of Yordex, comments: “As companies grow, their costs become harder to track. Businesses want to keep the fast decision-making capabilities of their early days, but there have been no financial tools available to help them achieve this – until now.”

“Yordex enables businesses to retain control over their spend as they scale up, so they can make rapid decisions based on real-time insights. Introducing smart company cards will make it even easier for fast-growing businesses to make intelligent choices.”

Companies already using the Yordex smart spend management solution will be offered complimentary cards as valued customers.

Erik concludes: “Every business is different, but they all have one thing in common: they’ve got better things to do than waste time on spend management. Our approach gives companies complete cash flow visibility without expensive, time-consuming software implementations, and adding smart company cards will enable business owners to focus on growing their business without compromising on financial insight and control.”

Ferrari
ArticlesCash ManagementInsurance

Purchasing your dream car – can it become a reality?

Ferrari

Purchasing your dream car – can it become a reality?

 

Buying a new car over one that is second-hand can bump up the price tag, but driving off the forecourt in your dream car is a feeling like no other. In fact, thousands of car buyers each year seek their dream car with a brand-new registration. So, without breaking the bank, how can you afford your dream car?

Buying a car by credit card

Paying through your credit card company can give you added protection on the full purchase cost (often as long as the value of the vehicle is over £100 and less than £30,000). Of course, you have to be able to meet your monthly payments too.

This method allows you to put down an even lower deposit than 10% and pay the rest of the vehicle off using a debit card. It’s best to consider all options here, as often the interest that you pay on a credit card could be significantly higher than that of a finance agreement.

If you want to buy a car by credit card however, it’s best to speak to your car dealer first as some dealerships don’t accept this method of payment.

Personal Contract Purchase agreement

PCP is an agreement where the end value of the car is agreed at the start of the contract, so you can plan your payments accordingly. Payments are often less than what you’d pay in a hire purchase agreement as you pay the full price of the car, plus interest but minus the guaranteed future value of the car. You must pass credit checks before you’re eligible for a PCP agreement.

When it comes to the end of your PCP agreement, you can either pay off the future value of the car to become the full owner, hand back the keys or trade the car in as a deposit for a new finance agreement.

To lower the monthly cost, you can place down a large initial deposit if you can afford it. Saving a lump sum for a large deposit is easier than saving up for a car, while reduced monthly payments can really help out too. Always evaluate your current monthly payments before you agree to a finance agreement, as being behind on your payments can lead to financial issues.

Be aware though, if you have exceeded the forecasted mileage on the car, there will be further charges to pay. This is because more miles decrease the value of the car. Also, any damage to the car will be charged to you, so you must be prepared to take good care of the vehicle.

Hire purchase agreement

This is relatively similar to a PCP agreement. It involves monthly payments with the option to purchase the car at the end of your agreement based on its new value.

A usual deposit for a car is 10% of the car’s value, but often you can pay more to reduce the follow-up monthly payments. The rest of the car is then payed off in instalments over a period of one to five years. The longer this period, the less you have to pay each month but due to interest charges, the total cost of the car becomes higher.

As we can see, there are a range of finance options available to you for purchasing new as oppose to used cars, allowing you to drive that dream car you’ve always wanted without forking out loads of cash. Save up what you can for a significant deposit and always make sure that you can cover the payments before signing any agreements.

santander
ArticlesBankingCash ManagementFinanceTransactional and Investment Banking

Santander Consumer Finance is expanding its online loan application platform across the UK

santander

Santander Consumer Finance is expanding its online loan application platform across the UK delivering an end-to-end digital solution

 

Santander Consumer Finance (SCF) is expanding its online loan application platform across the UK delivering an end-to-end digital solution for dealers further strengthening its commitment to growing the market.

The national launch of Apply Online which offers e-sign capability means customers can calculate the finance they need, receive immediate approvals and sign documentation at home or in showrooms ensuring that dealers remain in control.

Delivery of the end-to-end digital process has taken nine months since the launch of SCF’s online calculator in December and involved substantial financial and resource investments at SCF.

The calculator has proved popular – customers have generated more than 4.1 million quotes and 51 dealers have signed up for the calculator. Apply Online, which was successfully tested over the past month, is now available to all dealers using the calculator.

SCF’s digital solution is integrated into dealers’ websites and installation takes minutes for dealers who already have the calculator. SCF is providing additional support to help dealers make the most effective use of the digital proposition.

The system is designed to provide a simple, fair and personal experience for car buyers and builds on the success of SCF’s partnership with Volvo Car UK launched in April.

Stewart Grant, Santander Consumer Finance Commercial Director said: “We’ve worked hard to design a market leading end-to-end digital solution which ensures   dealers retain control of customer relationships while benefiting from our brand power.

“The financial investment and the time spent by our team in developing and delivering the digital transformation emphasises how committed we are to support our dealer network in maximising sales and profitability within the growing digital market.”

Dealers interested in using the calculator or wishing to register interest in the Online Application platform should contact their Business Development Manager or visit: www.santanderconsumer.co.uk/dealer

BankingCash Management

The importance of teaching financial literacy in school

Finance

The importance of teaching financial literacy in school

Money can be a touchy subject. Many of us feel awkward discussing our finances, but when studies show that three quarters of Britons were worried about their finances in 2018, it becomes clear that we can’t avoid the topic for much longer. Over half of UK adults attribute money worries to mental health issues, and the ever-growing anxiety about money needs to be tackled head-on. The question is, what’s going wrong?

One answer is lack of education. Children rarely receive lessons on budgeting and money management. The sudden responsibility of having to manage their own money often shocks young adults when they become financially independent. Along with Business Rescue Expert, who specialise in company liquidation, we will delve into the importance of financial literacy… 

Why should we teach kids about finances?

Recently, certain financial topics have been added to the national curriculum. These include savings and investments, pensions, mortgages, insurance, and financial products. It’s still a relatively recent introduction to schools, so not all teachers may feel confident in teaching it yet, due to the specialised, complex nature of the topics. There is also the matter of religious differences in the approach to and teaching of these finance lessons. Followers of the Islamic faith are prohibited from using any form of compound interest. This relates to things like conventional mortgages, student loans and car loans, all of which are commonplace in many other cultures.

Because of these factors, there are many difficulties when it comes to making financial literacy universal, understandable. Maths might seem like an obvious place to drop lessons of finance in amongst existing content, but debate is rife as to whether subjects like trigonometry are still deserving for a place on exam papers, when finance lessons could take their place and provide long-lasting life skills.

How are curriculum changing?

Life skills such as finances can be complex to teach in schools. Lessons in finance differ from core subjects like English and Science, as they provide life skills which, if not learned, will be detrimental as kids grow older and enter adult life. One UK primary school created its own bank, to combat ‘below average’ financial literacy learning.

Despite financial literacy being introduced to the national curriculum in England in 2014, not everyone believes that school is the place for financial education. Some believe the duty should be on parents to teach their children the real value of money and how to approach it. It’s worth noting that in private schools, faith schools, and academies, it isn’t a compulsory part of the curriculum, so many youngsters would still miss out on these lessons. A lot of schools who do incorporate it into the school day compartmentalize it into general ‘citizenship’ lessons, but it’s arguable whether enough emphasis is placed on it here.

What has changed in the ‘millennial’ era?

Judging by the results of countless studies, it is evident that millennials have large gaps in their knowledge about finance management. Millennials’ spending patterns stand in stark contrast to their predecessors; they’re keen to splash out on experiences and don’t often take to the idea of big commitment purchases seriously — for example, houses.

Millennial spending habits signify the disparity of their knowledge and attitude towards budgeting — research has found that 60% of these youngsters said they are willing to spend more than £3.11 on a single cup of coffee, while only 29% of baby boomers would splurge for caffeine. A lack of financial literacy in education has undoubtedly played a role in this, with many young people under the illusion that simply earning a lot of money means that you’ll never be in any debt, along with a general unwillingness when it comes to making sacrifices for the sake of budgeting.

One survey found that 42% of teenagers said that they wanted their parents to talk more about finances, and a staggeringly low 32% said that they knew how credit card fees and interest worked. Teenage years are pivotal points for learning, so why is financial literacy being left out?

Hopefully the future will hold the increased popularity of these lessons to remedy this lack of financial literacy. These skills will prove invaluable for youngsters as they progress through life, and they could eventually counteract the stereotype of a financially irresponsible or illiterate millennials.

WeSwap
Cash ManagementFunds

WORLD’S FIRST P2P CURRENCY EXCHANGE PLATFORM WESWAP HITS 500,000 USERS, LAUNCHES £2.3M FUNDRAISE

This morning, WeSwap, the award-winning peer-to-peer currency exchange platform, announces that in tandem with the launch of a £2.3 million funding round on leading investment platform Seedrs, it has hit 500,000 users. This raise will support the Series B investment round led by IW Capital, WeSwap’s lead investor, who has invested an additional £3.7 million in the travel money start-up, including £1.7 million of equity in this round.
 
Today’s news follows the company hitting a staggering £250 million in global currency traded on the platform since its launch in 2015, making the company the first peer-to-peer travel money fintech in the UK to do so. With award wins including Best Travel Money Provider at the 2018 and 2019 British Bank Awards, the fintech front runner has firmly cemented its role as one of the UK’s leading case studies for scale-up growth, fortifying a loyal and ever-expanding user base whilst maintaining the edge on product innovation and user experience.
 
WeSwap continues to hit remarkable milestones since its launch – presently, the currency exchange platform has over 30 travel industry partnerships, as well as booking flow integrations with online travel partners and numerous innovative travel-money products including:
 

  • A WeSwap pre-paid travel card
  • Card payments and withdrawals in over 195 countries and territories
  • Rate tracker
  • Smart Swap (where a user can pre-select an exchange rate at which they would like to execute a currency exchange)
  • Next day Travel Cash delivery
  • Buyback service

 
This is WeSwap’s third raise on Seedrs, having previously attracted over £3.5m from 3,868 investors.
 
Jared Jesner, CEO and Founder of WeSwap commented: “We have an incredibly loyal and engaged user base, something we’re truly proud of and will continue to honour with a great service. We are delighted to open up this latest round of funding, supplementing a series of debt, equity and private investment routes that have aided us in achieving some great milestones that we’re really proud of. This latest round will allow us to launch a range of new WeSwap product innovations and expand into Asia.”
 
For more information, please visit: www.seedrs.com/weswap3

Banking the Unbanked - Wealth & Finance Interational
BankingCash Management

Banking the Unbanked

Banking the Unbanked

  • About 75% of adults earning less than $2 a day don’t have a bank account
  • More than 2.5 billion people around the world don’t have a bank account
  • The poor face bureaucratic, travel distance and cost barriers

Millions of people around the globe lack power, credit and internet which result in them being unbanked. Being unbanked means not having access to the services of a bank or similar financial organization.The challenges are manifold; from not being able to receive deposits from an employer, to no credit history and being excluded from lending, to lacking the ability to safely save money or transfer money.

In 2014 there were 2 billion unbanked people. Account ownership is almost universal in high-income economies, hence, all unbanked adults live in developing economies. China and India, despite having relatively high account ownership, claim large shares of the global unbanked population because of their size. 225 million adults living there are without an account. China has the world’s largest unbanked population, followed by India (190 million), Pakistan (100 million), and Indonesia (95 million).

 

What are the challenges in banking the poor?

Three quarters of the world’s population, living in poverty, are unbanked. This is not just because of poverty, but also due to the cost, travel distance and amount of paperwork involved in opening an account. Our bank account number is almost as intrinsic to our identity as name and date of birth. Getting a job, renting a house and having an internet connection at home would be nearly impossible without some sort of financial inclusion.

Yet today the unbanked population stands at a staggering 1.7 billion globally, according to data released by the World Bank.

“Providing financial services to the 2.5 billion people who are ‘unbanked’ could boost economic growth and opportunity for the world’s poor,” said World Bank Group President Robert B. Zoellick. “Harnessing the power of financial services can really help people to pay for schooling, save for a home, or start a small business that can provide jobs for others. This new report on the world’s ‘unbanked’ makes the case: the more poor people are banking today, the more they are banking on their future.”

 

What further challenges stop people using a bank?

FairPlanet researched further, and even with access to a bank, evidence suggests people will still not trust the bank, the service is unreliable, and withdrawal fees are prohibitively expensive. People are not inclined to borrow because they do not want to risk losing collateral. While expanding access to various banking services (for instance, by lowering account opening fees) will benefit a minority, broader success may not be obtainable unless the actual service quality is vastly improved. Moreover, there are challenges on the demand side. Increased work needs to be done to understand what savings and credit products are best suited for the majority of the unbanked living in poverty.

 

Problem solving?

Blockchain payments allow for cheaper money transfers and lower account fees while upholding security and transparency. Open banking allows for new players to enter the field and begin assisting the underbanked in ways that have never before been allowed, and blockchain technology is poised as a key component in the entire process. With are a few companies emerging in this field and companies, such as FairPlanet, that host these payment methods, we can see a push for financial inclusivity. Serving adults who live on less than $5 a day is not only possible at scale—to a large degree, it is already happening.

BankingCash Management

Cardiff Business Secures £2.5m Second Charge Bridging Loan Within Just 3 Working Days

Pure Commercial Finance Secures £2.5m Second Charge Bridging Loan Within Just 3 Working Days

Commercial brokerage breaks records with speedy funding when previous lender pulls out of multi-million-pound deal last minute.

Pure Commercial Finance, the Cardiff-based brokerage, recently saved a multimillion-pound development by sourcing £2.5m of funding in just three days.

The client, an experienced property developer who wishes to remain anonymous, had a large site with planning permission for multiple homes. An existing lender had taken a charge out on the land to fund the project up to that point, but further finance was needed to complete the job to the developer’s high-quality standards.

This finance was secured, but even though loan documents had already been issued, the lender pulled out at the last minute.

The developer was blindsided and needed £2.5m of funding in days to prevent the development collapsing. Ben Lloyd of Pure Commercial Finance was approached by the developer to save the project, despite its very short turnaround time and a valuation which only covered the first charge amount.

Pure needed a new lender that would take a second charge behind the existing debt and would look at the overall merit of the land value and the final project, rather than the previous valuation. With these complications there are very few lenders that Pure could turn to and rely upon to deliver, so they approached Bushell Investment Group (BIG) who had shown the Pure team a proven track record of delivery in these types of situations.

The average industry turnaround time is around three weeks for second charge loans, but Pure completed the deal within three working days.

Ben Lloyd, Managing Director of Pure Commercial Finance said:

“Bushell Investment Group is an absolutely outstanding lender for complex jobs, especially in a time sensitive situation. I can tell that the BIG team worked as fast as humanly possible and that they wanted to prove that they could get this deal done.

“I worked very closely on this deal with Lee Bushell, the founder and principal of BIG, to make the deal happen.

“Even though there wasn’t a second valuation, which would turn off many lenders, BIG were comfortable with their own research that the asset was worth significantly more and decided to progress with the loan without the need for a new valuation.”

Cash Management

What can cryptocurrencies offer during political upheaval?

Commentary by Ana Bencic, founder & CEO of Nexthash

The political and economic climate within the UK has been uncertain in recent months. The value of the pound has been turbulent and it has been rising and falling in response to political events, such as the Brexit vote and the recent departure of the prime minister. Investors who have been taking notice of the unpredictable nature of fiat currency’s’ value in relation to political events, as well as the near-constant rise in the value of several cryptocurrencies, will be looking at what makes cryptocurrency a viable alternative to traditional currency.

 

After experiencing a 4-month slump due to Brexit insecurity, the pound rose back up to $1.2710 shortly after the Theresa May’s announcement of resignation. Unfortunately, the recovery was short-lived and the pound almost immediately lost 3% of its value in the following days. Now, traders are showing concern that the next prime minister may seek a tough Brexit deal, which may hurt the value of the pound more than before. With more uncertainty than ever in the market, including the inability to hold above 1.27, the pound, it is clear that the value of pound sterling is predicated on political factors.


In stark contrast, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin appear to be unaffected by political upheaval. The value of Bitcoin recently exceeded $8000, after a period of sustained growth over several months. Investors who are wary of traditional currencies will be attracted to the fact Bitcoin does not rely on any financial institutions or third-party entities. Bitcoin is a decentralized currency that uses peer-to-peer technology, which enables all functions such as currency issuance, transaction processing and verification to be carried out collectively by the network. While this decentralization renders Bitcoin free from government manipulation or interference, the flipside is that there is no central authority to ensure that things run smoothly or to back the value of a Bitcoin. Bitcoins are created digitally through a “mining” process that requires powerful computers to solve complex algorithms and crunch numbers. They are currently created at the rate of 25 Bitcoins every 10 minutes and will be capped at 21 million, a level that is expected to be reached in 2140.

Additionally, Bitcoin effectively increases efficiencies, adds security to transactions and eliminates traditional methods of fraud. Some economic analysts predict a big change in crypto is forthcoming as institutional money enters the market. Moreover, there is the possibility that crypto will be floated on the Nasdaq, which would further add credibility to blockchain and its uses as an alternative to conventional currencies. Some predict that all that crypto needs is a verified exchange traded fund (ETF). An ETF would definitely make it easier for people to invest in Bitcoin, but there still needs to be the demand to want to invest in crypto, which some say may not automatically be generated with a fund.

 


Cryptocurrencies are increasing in popularity with each passing day, as traditional investors & traders start to use it more often and several major first-world nations pass legislation in support of cryptocurrency trade and investment. At this point in time, there are 14 million Bitcoins in circulation. Countries with underdeveloped infrastructure and nations experiencing devaluation of their national currency can seize the advantages of cryptocurrencies- for the simple reason they are able to move money across their country’s borders with far greater ease than traditional currency. Cryptocurrencies exist outside of the control of central banks, where traditional accounts can be garnished or frozen. In fact, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin exist outside the regulations and laws that allow this to happen, it’s very rare to be unable to access your coins.





 

 

Cash ManagementFinanceSecuritiesTransactional and Investment Banking

What is next for cryptocurrency?

The rise of cryptocurrency is to be seen as a democratising force within the global economy. For example, secured token offering, has emerged as a true competitor to the traditional Initial Public Offering (IPO) for growing businesses. Judging from the growing acceptance of cryptocurrency by countries and companies, it is predicted that institutional investors will move towards secure cryptocurrency investments over the next decade, if not earlier. Ana Bencic, President and Founder of NextHash explores this phenomenon in more detail.

 

Uber Technologies Inc.’s large initial public offering launched in May and the ride-hailing app has run into some trouble. Uber proposed to go public with a $120 billion valuation, to be pitched by financiers at Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs ahead of its IPO. Nonetheless, the company eventually listed with a $75.5 billion market cap. The New York Times elucidated that institutional investors, many who privately owned Uber stock, would not purchase additional shares at a higher price. Uber had received in excesses of $10 billion from institutional investors and private equity firms, among other investors, according to the report and many bought their Uber shares at valuations below $61 billion.

 

The ride-hailing giant priced its IPO on Thursday 9th May at $45 a share, raising a minimum of $8.1 billion and putting Uber’s IPO well behind some of the other, large offerings on the U.S. market in recent years. Facebook Inc raised $16 billion its offering in 2012, while Visa Inc. raised close to $18 billion in 2008 and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. brought in around $25 billion in 2014.

 

Initial Public Offerings can offer companies the prospect to raise new equity capital; to monetise the investments of private shareholders such as corporation founders or private equity investors and to enable simple trading of existing holdings or future capital raising by becoming publicly traded enterprises. 

 

Nevertheless, for companies looking to list, there are potential drawbacks. Foremost, there is the risk that the required funding will not be raised. Additionally, the cost for accounting, marketing and legal professionals to get to the point of an IPO can be sizeable. It might also necessitate a significant amount of time and effort from the management team, potentially disrupting them from their primary task of running the business. Furthermore, as in Uber’s case, there is a. While no promises can be made in these circumstances, many may be looking at the recent state of these tech unicorns (privately held start-up enterprises valued at over $1 billion) such as Uber and even Facebook may have people pondering if the next big thing will follow the same path. 

 

Aside from financial sacrifice, the time and effort to get to the IPO stage and the administration required once a company has gone public or floated, is considerable. For companies at the front-line of technological advancements, time is of the essence. According to Street Directory, an IPO typically takes between six and nine months. In some cases, this procedure can take up to 18 months. For high-growth businesses, this kind of interval may well bump potential unicorns off their path to a £1 billion valuation and present their rivals with a huge advantage. So what other prospects do highly scalable businesses have? 

 

The cryptocurrency market provides distinctive opportunities for businesses in need of access to vital growth finance and for investors desiring access to potential unicorn businesses at an early stage. This is made likely by cryptocurrency platforms’ capacity to operate across borders, an advantage that isn’t possessed by conventional markets.

 

In April, the French parliament permitted a ground-breaking financial sector bill which aims to encourage both cryptocurrency traders and issuers to set up in France. Organisations looking to issue or trade both existing and novel cryptocurrencies will soon have the option to apply for official accreditation.  The scheduled certification process exhibits a degree of official acknowledgement of the cryptocurrency marketplace. Bills like this enable French investors to trade and invest cryptocurrencies, as well as facilitating businesses to be traded as a Secured Token Offering which would give investors, traders, and entrepreneurs a way to trade and exchange tokens for cryptocurrencies, bringing the ecosystem into the cryptocurrency world. In exchange for charging tax, France is laying the foundations for the Europe-wide adoption of cryptocurrency trading.

France is pushing for the European Union to adopt a regulatory framework on cryptocurrencies.

 

There has been a largely positive attitude towards cryptocurrency by several countries. Malta, Slovenia and France are strong examples of those who are encouraging the implementation and use of cryptocurrency for trading and investment. The ability to invest or trade freely and across borders is an attractive prospect for businesses, who are able to receive financial investment from foreign parties.

 

New technologies are allowing businesses that are not in a jurisdiction that has cryptocurrency regulation in place yet to be included in the new, second generation of scaling business investment. 

 

With Brexit on the horizon for the UK, economists are making their forecasts about how the worth of the pound will be affected. Due to the interdependence of the pound and euro, some have claimed that in either of the potential outcomes- there will likely be some loss in value to these traditional forms of currency.  Cryptocurrencies offer an alternative to traditional, fiat currencies for both consumers and companies, due to their unique advantages of being decentralised, transparent and wholly unaffected by the Brexit situation

 

With incongruent regulation and legal frameworks throughout the globe, platforms that empower a corporation or investor in one jurisdiction to trade or exchange tokens or currency with another trader in another country with a different statute could open the doors to potential unicorn companies to thousands of family offices, hedge funds and institutional investors in a matter of years. In the medium term, platforms that give businesses access to global growth finance could help developing countries and the wider global economy grow at a truly competitive rate to their Western counterparts. 

 

CONCLUSION

 

Cryptocurrencies have spent the last few years in a stage of growth and maturation. The emergent importance of blockchain-based cryptocurrencies is easy to grasp today. From the snowballing rate of adoption of Ethereum and Bitcoin by conventional institutions, the instituting of digital-assets trading platforms and the implementation of cryptocurrency-specific legislation by numerous countries both inside and outside of the EU- cryptocurrency is seeing far greater adoption by both institutional and private traders/investors. With the ability to invest in a corporation from anyplace in the world, quicker than by traditional means and with a far greater potential for a swift return on investment, cryptocurrency offers manifold unique and substantial advantages that have fortified it a lasting place in society.

 

 

Cash Management

Financial tools for budget-conscious freelancers & small businesses By Inna Kaushan, Solna

Running your own business can be high-pressure and expensive. With inevitable juggling of tasks, it is easy to leave financial management on the back burner. However, getting your finances organised and under control doesn’t have to be difficult, time consuming, or dull. You just need the right tools with the right automation!

 

Fortunately, there are plenty of free (or low cost) tools to give you a helping hand.

 

  1. Expensify: Expense management

 

Anyone working for themselves knows the pain of sorting through a pile of receipts: you promise yourself you’ll keep your receipts organised, but it can be boring, time-consuming, and even difficult to manage. A train ticket, a coffee, expenses soon mount up and find you have six months’ worth of expenses to go through.

 

Expensify is great for people who pile up receipts. It offers receipt scanning, next-day reimbursement, GPS mileage tracking, and tax tracking. You can allocate costs to specific jobs, set up unlimited categories, and import your credit or debit cards so that everything sits under one account. It consolidates all your expenses and makes them easier to manage.

 

It even comes with a virtual assistant driven by AI: Concierge. This reminds you to submit receipts, review reports, and automates things for you.

 

How much does it cost? Individual plans are £3.99 a month and group plans start from just £4 per user/month.

 

  1. Monese: Personal and business banking

 

‘Next-gen’ banks using smartphone technology have gone above and beyond to improve our banking experience. Their apps allow you to manage everything remotely, online, and in the cloud.

 

Monese provides freelancers and small businesses with a UK-based bank account that can be set up within hours. It is completely mobile, so you can manage all your banking needs using the smart mobile app that has been especially designed to provide flexibility and easy transfers.

 

If you pay for your Monese account, you can use your card anywhere in the world with no fees! You can also manage your account in 10 different languages.

 

How much does it cost? If you’re a freelancer, you can use Monese’s free account that will give you access to all the features, but will charge you for cash machine withdrawals and payments abroad. You’ll even have to pay a fiver to get your card delivered. The two paid accounts cost £4.95 and £14.95, where you’ll get a free card and will be able to access some or all those features for free. There’s also a business account (£9.95 a month) where you get a two-in-one Monese Business and Monese Plus personal account. You’ll be able to separate your business and personal spend with free dedicated debit cards and manage both seamlessly from one place!

 

  1. Emma: Budgeting and savings

 

If you want to be good with your money, Emma is a handy little tool that lets you effortlessly manage your cash flow and gives you the control you need over your finances. Thought to be the UK’s answer to Mint, Emma’s main goal is to improve the financial situation of its users. It works by aggregating your bank accounts and credit cards to give you a full picture of your finances.

 

Emma acts as your personal finance adviser by keeping track of all your spending, subscriptions, and even alerting you on any overdrafts. Emma can also help you keep track of debt repayments and it even prompts you to save money by suggesting what you can afford to save at the end of each month. Yes, it’ll spot if you’ve been buying too many flat whites!

 

How much does it cost? Emma is free to use but users also have the option to upgrade to Emma Pro for premium features including custom categories, unlimited budgeting, and data exports

 

 

  1. Solna: Invoicing

 

For some freelancers and small businesses, getting paid means sending email attachments, mailing pieces of paper, sending chaser emails etc. While it might sound simple, it can often all end up being a massive admin job without the right help.

 

If you want to get paid on time, smart invoicing is the way to go — Solna is packed with smart features to protect freelancers and small businesses whether they’re new to the game or not, and it makes invoicing quick and easy. 

 

With Solna, users can create, customise and send invoices in seconds. It also sends automatic payment reminders to those annoying late payers and lets you track every invoice until it’s in your account. Invoices also come with read receipts, so no more chasing random accounting people either. It will help you get paid faster.

 

You can also get a better view of who you’re doing business with and make the best decisions when setting payment terms using Solna’s credit check facility. It’s an invoicing tool with brains.

 

How much does it cost? You can sign up to Solna’s free version that provides access to invoice templates and customers’ credit scores for a limited number of customers. The paid packages give you invoice tracking, recurring invoices, advanced reporting in addition to more customers and templates.

 

  1. Stripe: Payments

 

As a freelancer or small business, maintaining your cash flow is crucial, so it’s in your best interest to avoid long delays between the time of sale and getting paid. Offering your customers multiple payment options is one way to avoid this — the more payment options you offer, the fewer excuses your clients will have to delay payment: online, mobile or contactless.

 

Stripe is your one-stop-shop for everything you need to get paid. Used by millions of businesses, Stripe is secure and easy for your customers to use and allows you to accept online and in-person payments from anyone in any country.

 

 

How much does it cost? Stripe charges a standard 1.4% transaction charge plus a 20p per transaction fee for European cards and 2.9% plus a 20p fee for non-European cards. There are no setup, monthly or hidden fees and you only have to pay for what you use.

 

Cash Management

Sphera Acquires Chemical Data Management Software Company SiteHawk

Sphera, the largest global provider of Integrated Risk Management software and information services with a focus on Environmental Health & Safety, Operational Risk and Product Stewardship, announces the acquisition of SiteHawk, a leading software and services provider for Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and chemical data management solutions.

 

Sphera acquired SiteHawk, a Smyrna, Tennessee-based software company, to advance usability and capabilities for chemical management and managed regulatory content. The SiteHawk product accelerates Sphera’s next phase of product integration for Product Stewardship into SpheraCloud, the Software as a Service (SaaS) platform that was launched in 2017. 

 

SiteHawk’s chemical management products are used in many of the industries that Sphera works with, including manufacturing, Oil & Gas and chemical manufacturing.

 

“The acquisition of SiteHawk not only expands Sphera’s cloud-based solutions, but also extends Sphera’s Product Stewardship content, services and markets while extending our leadership position in the Product Stewardship space,” said Paul Marushka, Sphera’s president and CEO. “As the industry leader, we believe it is critical to continue innovating and expanding our portfolio of cloud-based and content solutions while also enhancing our world-class, on-premise products. We also want to welcome SiteHawk’s current customers and colleagues into the Sphera family.”

 

These deals underscore Genstar Capital’s commitment to investing in Sphera to enhance their product breadth for their global customers. This marks Sphera’s fourth acquisition, following deals to acquire Rivo Software in 2017, sparesFinder in 2018 and Petrotechnics earlier this year. 

 

“Genstar is committed to growing the Sphera brand through strategic investments,” said Geoff Miller, principal at Genstar Capital. “The SiteHawk acquisition will serve to enhance Sphera’s industry-leading solutions in the Product Stewardship space as part of a comprehensive Integrated Risk Management strategy for chemical management.”

 

Sphera is a portfolio company of Genstar Capital, a leading middle-market private equity firm, which acquired the OERM business (now Sphera) from IHS Markit in June 2016. Vaquero Capital acted as financial adviser to SiteHawk during the transaction. SiteHawk is backed by Level Equity. Financial terms of this transaction were not disclosed.

Cash ManagementTransactional and Investment Banking

Aryaka Raises $50M to Accelerate Global Managed SD-WAN Expansion

Series F, Led by Goldman Sachs, Enables Company to Quickly Grow Revenues, Headcount & Global Footprint

Aryaka®, the global leader in managed SD-WAN, today announced it has closed a $50 million Series F round of funding led by Goldman Sachs Private Capital Investing. This brings Aryaka’s total funding to $184 million. Additionally, it was announced that Matthew Dorr of Goldman Sachs will join Aryaka’s Board of Directors as a Board Member, and Michael Kondoleon will join as an observer. Goldman Sachs will be joining existing investors including Trinity Ventures, Mohr Davidow Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners, InterWest Partners, Presidio Ventures, Third Point Ventures and DTCP.

The funding will be used to scale business operations, grow revenues and hire exceptional talent, as Aryaka continues to see larger deal sizes and global customer expansion.
“We’re constantly evaluating the market for high-growth companies that are leaders in their space. Our research shows that Aryaka offers a compelling solution for the SD-WAN market that continues to grow exponentially including increased adoption of SD-WAN managed services,” said Matthew Dorr, vice president at Goldman Sachs Private Capital Investing. “We decided to invest in Aryaka because of their highly differentiated offering, strong customer base, global footprint and their experienced management team.”

“We are pleased to receive this investment from Goldman Sachs. This new investment allows us to further accelerate our business momentum and endorses our growth strategy,” said Matt Carter, CEO of Aryaka. “We are extremely well positioned to help our customers drive WAN transformation and their multi-cloud and application performance initiatives; all while being delivered ‘as-a-service’.”

In the last twelve months, Aryaka has continued to accelerate business growth, which has resulted in thousands of globally managed sites and significantly larger annual recurring revenue (ARR) streams. The Company has also brought in seasoned members to its leadership team, established new go-to-market partnerships and continued to build out a best-in-class global network of points-of-presence (POPs). These POPs have been supplemented with global Network Operations Centers (NOCs) and 24X7 support.

As multi-cloud requirements have grown, Aryaka has cemented partnerships with the leading public cloud providers including AWS, Microsoft Azure, Google, Oracle and others. These partnerships allow Aryaka to offer the industry’s best managed cloud connectivity options and deliver a true, multi-cloud solution. In addition, through partnerships with Palo Alto Networks, Symantec and Zscaler, Aryaka brings a full-fledged security solution to the edge.
Aryaka’s continued innovation around its orchestration platform, connectivity solutions, edge devices, WAN optimization and security software all combine to form the most integrated solution in the industry. Aryaka is the only SD-WAN platform that has both the technology stack as well as a highly available global network that offers managed services at scale. This platform provides customers a seamless solution and delivers the best possible end-user application experience. Aryaka currently has more than 800 global customers, including JAS Worldwide, HMSHost International, Makinohttps://www.aryaka.com/press/sd-wan-revolutionizes-manufacturing-it/], [Pilot Freight, Element Solutions, Allegis, and City & Guilds Group.

For more on Aryaka, please visit: https://www.aryaka.com/
Visit the Aryaka blog: https://www.aryaka.com/blog/https://www.aryaka.com/blog/
Follow Aryaka on Twitter: @AryakaNetworks
Visit Aryaka on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/aryaka-networks/

Cash Management

Protecting your family legacy in a digital age

By Alex McCready, Head of Reputation and Privacy at Vardags

 

“It’s the family name that lives on. It’s all that lives on...” (Tywin Lannister, Games of Thrones)

 

We all care deeply about our family and want to ensure that whatever we pass onto younger generations stands the test of time. This concern is particularly acute for prominent families. When the older generation passes on a corporate dynasty to the younger generation – it is not only business assets and wealth they are passing on, but the family’s reputation and legacy.

 

The reputation of a family can be one of its greatest assets, but it is something that needs to be protected and cultivated. The line between business and personal is often blurred. For example, a business closely linked to a prominent family is particularly vulnerable, as any damaging allegations / controversy about a particular family member will have ramifications for the business as well.

 

Family legacy and succession planning is a hot topic and one that any family office or wealth manager will be well versed in. At Vardags, we think safeguarding reputation is an essential part of succession planning.

 

So what steps should prominent families be thinking about in this situation?

 

Knowing what’s out there

 

Despite the rise in technology, many of us don’t actually know what information is out there about us online.

 

One of the most empowering things a family can do is to establish precisely what information is out there about family members and those closely associated with the family. The results are almost always surprising. It will often uncover:

 

  • Private information that they didn’t know was available, such as homes addresses, family photographs and details of planning applications – see ‘Protecting the Private’ below
  • Some of the information might be disparaging – perhaps on blog sites or social media
  • You might realise that the family’s online reputation doesn’t match the family’s values. For example, there is huge amounts of information about a controversial investment or business deal, but very little about the family’s philanthropic work

This information is critical to understanding your family’s current reputation and, importantly, what you want it to be for generations to come.

 

Protecting the private

 

Without being alarmist, prominent families are at a greater risk of being targeted by cyber criminals and identity thieves, as well as kidnap and blackmail attempts.

 

One of the easiest steps a family can take is to minimise the amount of private information available online; for example, residential addresses and other personal biographical data, such as photos or images of homes of your children’s school. Information available on social media also provides a rich source of intel for the unscrupulous. For example, if a family member checks into locations or venues via social media, they can quite literally be creating a map of their movements for members of the press, or worse, criminals. Some basic changes to social media privacy settings can disable these location services.

 

Next Gen’s online legacy

 

It only takes one careless tweet, indiscrete Instagram snap or careless remark to tarnish a family’s reputation.

 

What the older generation did as teenagers is, thankfully, less likely to come back to haunt them and is generally limited to some embarrassing photographs in a friend’s photo album. The risk for today’s Next Gen are far greater, as many are living their lives through social media. The toddlers of today will have a significant online legacy by the time they turn 21 and are looking for a job. It’s already become part of the recruitment process for employers to take a look at a prospective employees Facebook page, and this is only going to continue.

 

A blanket ban on social media is both unrealistic and unnecessary. But education on the risks associated with social media is essential. Basic guidance on privacy settings on sites like Facebook and Snapchat is key.

 

I’m seeing some families even drawing up a family social media policy. This can be as simple as an agreed set of guidelines on what the family’s approach to social media will be. The policy should reflect the family’s values, such as agreeing that overt demonstrations of wealth don’t fit with those values. For example, the family might want to draw a very distinct line between individual family’s members and the family business. Alternatively, the family members might be an intrinsic part of the business and part of the family “brand” – in which case making sure there are clear parameters on what is and isn’t acceptable is absolutely critical. 

 

The aim is to both protect the family and encourage family members to live by its values, whatever those may be.

 

Dealing with disputes

 

Families argue. That’s an inevitable fact of life. But families should do all they can to ensure that those dispute aren’t conducted in the full public gaze and don’t irrevocably harm the family’s reputation and business.

 

We’ve seen one family break-down hitting the headlines in the US recently. The Dorrance family, who have a controlling interest in the Campbell Soup Company, have come under the spotlight following the death of their patriarch and the long-time Campbell chairman, John T. Dorrance Jr. Some family members announced their intention of selling their shares, which led to turmoil at the company and attracted the interest of an activist hedge fund.

 

Having a plan which sets out how family disputes are dealt with is vital. It’s also crucial to give the media as little ammunition as possible should the family end up in the headlines. That is why the steps outlined above are so valuable for minimising the risk of a small story mushrooming into a big one.

Alex McCready, Head of Reputation and Privacy at Vardags
Cash ManagementTransactional and Investment Banking

Huq Industries in £1.4m Raise with Equity Investors 24 Haymarket

Huq Industries, the leading geo-behavioural consumer research platform, today announces £1.4M in new funding led by 24 Haymarket. Huq’s real-world consumer research datasets and cloud-based market analysis tools help customers across media, finance, real-estate and retail make informed and effective business decisions. This investment will be used by Huq Industries to support the acquisition of research data for use both in existing markets, and meet to demand for its products internationally.

Conrad Poulson of Huq Industries said:

“This investment enables Huq to accelerate the commercialisation of our platform across our key verticals and geographies. 24 Haymarket together with our existing shareholders provide us with both the funds and the network to support Huq through a very exciting phase of its growth.”

Alex Warren of 24 Haymarket commented:

“In 2018, Huq commercially validated its unique geo-behavioural data with major players in the out-of-home sector. This capital raise will allow Huq to grow its proprietary international data, capitalise on the global out-of-home opportunity, and expand into other large target markets like finance and property. A Chief Commercial Officer has been recruited and the board strengthened to support this growth. Huq is uniquely positioned to capitalise on the growing appreciation of the value of such data amongst a broad and diverse enterprise customer base.”

About Huq Industries

Huq Industries was founded in 2014 by Conrad and Isambard Poulson together with Alexander Fairfax to accurately measure and predict offline consumer trends. Over 90% of retail spend still takes place in the real world. Measuring this behaviour reliably and at scale leads to sought-after insight, but is hard to achieve using conventional methods.

Huq Industries partners with mobile app publishers to collect first-party geo-spatial data from across the globe. This data is then abstracted to identify real-world consumer insight and trends. Huq’s customers and partners include professional investors, leading market research and media agencies alongside some of the world’s largest real-estate owners.

About 24 Haymarket

24 Haymarket is a premium deal-by-deal investment platform focused on high-growth businesses, investing up to £5 million in any particular company. 24 Haymarket’s Investor Network includes several highly-experienced private equity and venture capital investors, seasoned entrepreneurs and senior operators. We invest our own capital in direct alignment with entrepreneurs and typically seek board representation to actively support their growth agenda. Since inception in 2011, 24Haymarket has invested in more than 50 high-growth businesses.

Cash ManagementTransactional and Investment Banking

Understanding and mitigating Bad Debt risks

Bad debt is a sum of owed money which has been outstanding over time and the prospect of it being repaid has diminished, making the debt unrecoverable. This is typically a result of the debtor going into liquidation or administration as they are out of money. As a business owner, you are at high risk of building up bad debt as you will trade with a number of different suppliers and customers, some of which may not have a dependable track record for borrowing, writes Keith Tully of RBR Advisory.

 

In order to protect yourself from bad debt, it’s vital to put measures into place and recognise the warning signs. An accumulation of bad debt can attack working capital, soon having detrimental effects on the financial health of your business. Late paying customers can create cash flow issues by causing a slowdown in income which limits the amount of cash available for the business.

 

A late invoice can easily turn into bad debt if it is left outstanding for a prolonged period of time. By tacking late payment early in the process and putting the correct protections into place, you may have a higher chance at recouping the money. By recognising the warning signs of bad debt, you can mitigate it and guard your business by following a few simple steps:

 

Due diligence

If you hold suspicions that a customer is unserious about making payment, carry out a credit check which is essentially a risk assessment exercise. This will highlight the consumer’s attitude to borrowing, their financial behaviour and whether any legal action has been taken against them. A quick search on Companies House will also show you whether the business is solvent, a basic indicator that the business has cash available.

 

In some cases, word of mouth can give you a true opinion of the business you are dealing with. Social media is an easily accessible platform which houses reviews directly from consumers. Carry out a quick search on social media to read what others are saying about them, both positive and negative. This will give you a taste of the character of the company through the click of a button.

 

Deposit, interest and penalties

In order to ensure that your time and labour proves worthwhile and profitable, ensure that you request for a deposit to be made which demonstrates financial commitment. If the payment falls into the bad debt category, this will only apply to a fraction of the overall funds as the remaining would have been paid as a deposit which protects your business to an extent.

 

In the event of missed payments, consequences should be made clear early in the process to prevent outstanding payments from maturing into bad debt. This could include adding interest or a penalty to penalise the business from missing payments. If the business is experiencing financial difficulties, this may prompt them to communicate their financial status.

 

Payment reminders

Scheduling a series of payment reminders is one of the first steps you can take to mitigate bad debt. By prompting for payment ahead of the due date, the business will be aware of the upcoming payment. Displaying clear payment information on each invoice will also make it easy to make payment as the information will be readily available. Scheduling frequent reminders after the payment date has passed can help flag up the outstanding invoice and it may just be as simple as a reminder that is required for payment to be made.

 

 

 

 

 

Debt distribution

Distributing the risk of bad debt by spreading your client base can prove beneficial in the long term. As a small business, winning a contract with a large enterprise is an achievement, both financially and in reputation. However, if your business takes the risk of becoming dependable on service solely from the large business, you fall into the trap of failing to spread your business proportionally. If the bigger business fails to make payment on time or becomes insolvent, you run the risk of cutting off your only stream of income, pushing your own business into decline.

 

Selected larger institutions are notorious for making late payments to smaller suppliers, a topic which was high on the agenda during the Spring Statement. Following a clamp down on late payments, the Chancellor proposed that auditors of listed companies should report on the performance of late payments in annual reports. The role of the Small Business Commissioner was also established in 2017 to ensure fair payment to Britain’s small businesses and resolving payment disputes for smaller businesses.

 

For example, in the event of Carillion, many small businesses were forced to liquidate as a result of late payments from Carillion. Following the demise of the construction firm, the business owed thousands of businesses and was known to breed a late payment culture in which smaller suppliers were a non-priority.

 

Statutory Demand

A statutory demand is a formal action which is taken to request for payment from a company, this is issued before a winding up petition. The statutory demand gives the debtor 21 days to make payment or reach an agreement. If the debtor fails to fulfil the statutory demand, you are able to request to wind up their company in an attempt to compensate for the bad debt.

 

Winding up petition

As a final and more pressing resort, taking legal action can speed up the process of retrieving owed money. If standard methods of recovery have failed, this may be an effective option which can help set your business back on track. A winding up petition is a court order taken out against the debtor. If granted by the court, they will call for the compulsory liquidation of the business unless the amount owed can be realistically repaid or terms renegotiated. This is a costly and lengthy process so if you are able to settle the manner out of court, it could protect your business from incurring court fees.

 

Understanding and mitigating bad debt can protect your business from having to write off debt when in reality it can be recovered. Bad debt can bite a large chunk out of your working capital, restricting investment activity and posing financial hurdles which could hinder the business from prospering.

 

RBR Advisory

https://www.realbusinessrescue.co.uk/advisory

 

ArticlesCash ManagementInfrastructureRisk Management

Samuel Knight’s aggressive five-year growth plan leads to new office opening in Baghdad

Newcastle-based Samuel Knight International has announced plans to open a new office in Baghdad as part of its extensive international growth plans. This move will support clients of the specialist global energy and rail recruitment firm and further ensure the company abides by compliance laws in Iraq.

Haider Kadhim, Samuel Knight’s Iraq Country Manager will be the point of contact for clients and candidates in the city. The firm will officially launch the office opening in an event next month that is expected to see representatives from the Department of Trade Industry along with other several reputable organisations attend.

Commenting on the firm’s success, Steve Rawlingson, CEO at Samuel Knight said:

“Our aggressive five-year growth plan is manifesting at such an impressive rate, taking the company to exciting new territories. The team is working diligently to surpass expectations set out in the plan and ensure Samuel Knight is cemented as the leading global energy and rail recruitment specialist. Our Baghdad office will give us a distinctive edge over our competition and allow for more exciting business opportunities. Once the office becomes more established and client acquisition develops, we will certainly be adding more consultants and manpower in the city.”

Cash Management

Is The UK Making The Most Of Its Money?

With Brexit uncertainties causing loss of income for both companies and individuals, Wealth & Finance Magazine argues that not enough is being done to make the most out of investment opportunities.

The UK’s uncertain ongoing membership of the EU means that investors needs to be making the most out of their money and assets to ensure their long-term financial stability.

After all, professional salaries in the UK are set to remain relatively flat throughout 2019, as Britain’s pending departure from the EU impacts employee confidence and business willingness to spend.

The findings come from the annual Salary Survey produced by global recruitment consultancy Robert Walters.

“Uncertainty around Brexit has created a fear of ‘last in first out,’ which in turn has meant that employees are less willing to move roles as swiftly as they would have in previous years,” states Chris Hickey, CEO of the UK, Middle East & Africa at Robert Walters. 

“As a result, despite there being high demand for specialist and highly skilled professionals, companies are finding themselves contending with a UK-wide candidate shortage across most disciplines.”

Despite this, according to research by The Big Window for Quilter, the majority of UK adults do not seek financial advice on how they transfer wealth to the next generation, at a time when HMRC figures are showing the government’s tax take on inheritance is at £5.2 billion. The survey shows that nearly two-thirds (63%) of UK adults have not sought any information or professional advice on the transfer of wealth to their next of kin, and only 15% said they had sought information or professional advice on both transferring their wealth whilst still living and also at death.

HMRC figures show that inheritance tax bills rose by 8% last year, however, over a third of respondents (35%) who have not sought this type of information or advice said this was something they hadn’t even considered before. A further 22% said they did not feel they needed the information and advice, whilst 20% said they did not have enough assets to justify paying for the advice.

The research also revealed that nearly three quarters (73%) of respondents do not have a wealth transfer or inheritance plan in place, while 40% have not discussed plans to pass on wealth to family members who will benefit. A similar proportion of respondents (41%) said they had discussed their plans, but not in great detail.

Pamela Reid, Client Services Director at Quilter Cheviot, commented on the findings.

 “Inheriting is assumed to be completely normal, yet this research shows it is still something that isn’t openly discussed and in many cases isn’t being planned. It is never too early to start planning, and these findings should encourage financial advisers to open the discussions with their clients wherever possible; addressing common misconceptions and concerns and encouraging them to be as transparent with their next of kin earlier.” 

 

Rachael Griffin, tax and financial planning expert at Quilter, added: “The inheritance tax system has layers and layers of complication, which have created a Jenga tower on the verge of toppling over. The technical nuances mean you have to be heavily versed in rules of inheritance tax to know the best way to pass wealth on to the next generations. Currently, the Office of Tax Simplification are reviewing inheritance tax, which will hopefully recommend some ways to remove these complications. However, they’ve said that it won’t be an overhaul and so financial advice is and will continue to be, crucial to gain comfort and security in your financial plan. One simple change could be bringing allowances up to date. For instance, the annual IHT gifting allowance has remained at £3,000 since 1981. Had the annual allowance tracked inflation, it would’ve been permissible to gift £11,296 per tax year in 2018, according to the Bank of England inflation tracker.”

Inheritance taxes and ongoing wealth protection are not the only issues facing British adults. There are many pitfalls still to come, and with many not paying proper attention to their investment products and how their money works for them, more needs to be done to educate the population to ensure its ongoing financial health.

Cash Management

Gender And The Investment Industry: Why The Industry Needs To Focus On Women

The investment industry has been historically dominated by men, but in today’s society exclusivity is key, as Staff Writer Hannah Stevenson highlights.

The gender pay gap has long been a key focus across the corporate market, with many firms seeking to eradicate it and usher in a new era for female empowerment. However, the equally pressing gender investment gap remains less focused on despite the fact that it is as, if not more, important.

Recently, an investigation from price comparison experts Money Guru has uncovered the top six reasons why women need to invest more than men, most of which revolved around the amount of unpaid work women did, whether it be caring, childrearing or the hours they spent poorly paid as a result of the gender pay gap.

Deborah Vickers, channel director at moneyguru.com commented on the findings of the firm’s survey and what they mean for society.

“We have never seen a gender gap when it comes to applications for credit at moneyguru.com which is great to see. Just a generation ago women were viewed as a riskier investment by banks and stores and often had to get their father or husband to sign for most loans. It shows real progress that just as many women as men are taking the lead when it comes to finding the right deals for them.”

 “However, these stats show that there is a still long way to go to empower women when it comes to their finances, especially if it is leaving them worse off in later life. Aversion to risk is something that we need to address across the board and in particular when it comes to supporting women to be more confident when it comes to financial investments.”

The underserving of women in the financial industry has also become apparent to deVere Switzerland, part of one of the world’s largest independent financial advisory organisations, which recently held the ‘Women in Finance’ summit in Zurich.

deVere Switzerland Area Manager, Daniel O’Leary, stated: “There are an increasing number of women-focused networks, events and initiatives but very few really drilling into the solution and ‘how to’ aspect of women achieving their financial goals and independence.

“But with a strong presence of women consultants in our office – more than 25%, which is considerably ahead of industry average – we are uniquely placed to help address the issue of women being historically under served by the financial advisory sector. This is why we launched Women & Finance, an invite-only event which was fully-booked within days. The strong demand is evident.”

Indeed, it appears to be one of the fastest growing areas of the industry. Recent estimates suggest that a third of the world’s private wealth is now in the hands of women. Research from Boston Consulting suggests that this number could hit £54 trillion by 2020.

When it comes to gaining investment in their business, women are equally unsupported, as Jenny Tooth OBE, CEO of UKBAA comments.

“UK Business Angels Association research has shown the disparity between the potential investment available for men and women. It found that over half (54%) of female angel investors had backed at least one female-founded business whilst only a small minority of male investors had done the same.

“It’s an old trope: men are cavalier with money, women are cautious. I’m usually reluctant to go along with generalisations, but when it comes to the pitching room I find that female entrepreneurs do undersell themselves; asking for just enough, or even less investment than they need. I hear myself saying: “Are you sure that’s all?” Whereas with men, I’m met with outrageous requests. The truth is that neither approach inspires confidence in investors.

“But the trouble women face is that they are walking into rooms filled predominantly with men, for whom a cautious approach may be a red flag. Have a growth plan, work out how to execute it, and remember that investors are not the enemy. This will help to inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs and business leaders to promote women in business and good equal practices.”

These latest initiatives and studies show that the financial industry is, albeit slowly, turning towards a focus on female investments, and looking ahead the market will need to continue to drive funds and resources towards empowering women to invest to drive global growth.