Personal finance

By Annie Charalambous, Content Manager at ETX Capital

The pandemic has drastically impacted our lives and our savings. Research shows that while lower-income households across the UK have had to dip into their savings to stay afloat, higher-income households have grown theirs.

It seems everyone is looking for new income streams and ways to get more bang for their buck – including navigating the often-complex world of savings and investments – and they’re turning to the internet for advice on where to start.

That’s why we’ve filtered through the noise to give you the nation’s top 10 most commonly asked questions around personal finance – and answer them too.

 

Which shares should I buy (49,500 monthly searches) and how? (9,900 monthly searches)

The shares you choose to invest in will depend on various factors, including the level of risk you’re willing to take, the overall market climate, and much more. Before you do buy (or short) any shares, you’ll want to do your homework on both the company and the industry at large.

For example, if you see ABC Manufacturers’ stock price is up this year, before buying in, you may want to look at how their performance stacks up against competitors like XYZ Manufacturers or view their most recent quarterly report.

There are always opportunities in the market to suit every budget and experience level, but much like picking the winning lottery numbers, there is no winning formula for what to invest in, or when.

 

Which companies are in the FTSE100? (40,500 monthly searches)

The FTSE100 is made up of the 100 largest (qualifying*) companies (by market cap – available shares multiplied by current share price) listed on the London Stock Exchange. The index acts as a major indicator of the UK stock market at large. Its 3 largest constituents are Unilever, AstraZeneca, and HSBC.

*To qualify, a company must meet requirements set out by the FTSE Group.

 

What is an ISA? (12,100 monthly searches)

An ISA, or ‘Individual Savings Account’, is a savings account available to anyone in the UK over 16, without taxing the interest earned on it. Considered a lower-risk investment, the drawbacks are that you can only hold one active ISA per year, and you are capped on how much you place in it (currently at £20,000).

There are two kinds of ISAs: a ‘cash ISA’, whereby you pay into it like you would a traditional savings account to earn interest, and a ‘shares ISA’, where your money is invested in stocks and bonds and neither the interest – nor any profit – is taxed. While the latter has more potential for greater returns, being tied to the stock market also means a greater risk of losing money.

 

What are bonds? (8,100 monthly searches)

A bond represents a loan, typically given to a body like a government or large company, by an investor. Governments may opt to issue bonds to raise money, and then agree to buy these bonds back at a later (agreed-upon) ‘maturity’ date. Bonds are considered a low-risk investment and can be a good way to diversify your portfolio with minimal exposure.

 

What is an ETF? (6,600 monthly searches)

ETFs, or ‘Exchange-Traded Funds’, are an asset type similar to index funds, in that they comprise of different stocks – usually representative of a particular sector – and are typically managed by larger companies (Vanguard, iShares, etc.). However, index funds are connected to exchanges and correlate more with that country’s economy and stock market.

 

What is a hedge fund? (5,400 monthly searches)

A hedge fund is an aggregated pool of money from different investors that is managed by an institution or individual. The hedge fund manager closely monitors the investment and is able to react and adjust accordingly (as per their strategy).

 

What is pension drawdown? (5,400 monthly searches)

Pension drawdown occurs when you continue to invest into a pension whilst simultaneously withdrawing money from it, essentially giving yourself a steady ‘income’ out of your own pension pot.

 

What are dividends? (4,400 monthly searches)

Dividends are a portion of a company’s profits that are distributed among its shareholders.

For example, if you buy 10 shares in ABC Manufacturing and they pay an annual dividend of £5 per share, you’ll be eligible for £50 back in your pocket that year – if you’re still holding those shares at the ex-dividend date.

 

What is cryptocurrency? (4,400 monthly searches)

Cryptocurrencies are digital-only currencies held on the blockchain. Unlike regular ‘cash’ currencies, cryptocurrencies aren’t tied to any central bank and are therefore unregulated, volatile, and considered a high-risk investment.

Those are coincidentally the same reasons for the relatively mass adoption over recent years – as more institutions accept and even integrate the likes of Bitcoin, XRP, Ethereum, and countless others, these assets risk becoming a part of the very world they were created to challenge.

Posted by Akeela Zahair